Thursday, July 14, 2016

The Snoop Dogg Project




 Without the words, the pic above brings back so many memories because in 1994, this was one of many posters I had on my wall, yes indeed.


Believe it or not, I went back and forth as to whether I was going to do a project on the one and only Snoop Dogg, however, after a little while of such back and forth, I decided to go ahead with those plans. Even with the slight name change in 1998, he's always been "Snoop Doggy Dogg" to me. Yes, here we are, the Snoop Dogg Project, still can't believe I wasn't able to come up with a creative title for the project, but it's all good, it's the thought that counts. Before I ultimately get started, I have to begin things with quite a few nostalgic moments. I first heard Snoop via the classic "Deep Cover", and I've been a fan ever since, so we're talking almost 25 years of support. From there, it didn't take me long to hear him on "The Chronic" album, another classic (and that will be the subject of a revisit on this blog) as well as his 1993 debut, "Doggystyle", which is my #9 favorite album of all time. Speaking of his debut, not only do I remember him being one of the hottest MCs in hip hop at the time, I also remember this was during the time when I was in the 4th grade at Stuart Elementary School, representing Petersburg, VA! My mom, for obvious reasons, refused to buy me the "Doggystyle" cassette (lol), so I had a friend named Kelvin (we were in the same class together) dub me a copy, plus he would do the same with "The Chronic" a few weeks later. My mom had no idea either of these tapes were in my possession, and even as a 9 year old boy pushing 10, I knew what I listening to and already I was far more mature in my early years than some of my friends. Continuing on, as always mentioned in some form on the blog, Death Row Records was on top of the world at this point and I was a big fan, leading to me doing an essay on something hip hop related for the first time (in my 4th grade year), and even though this essay was mostly about Dr. Dre and how he was my favorite rapper at the time, I did give somewhat of an equal shine to Snoop throughout (man I wish I still had that essay, lol). Ah, the memories.

I thought I'd start this with a little nostalgia of course, and that leads us to the project itself!! I'll be focusing primarily on Snoop's solo material, from his debut up to 2015's "Bush." I'll also be taking a first time look at his "Reincarnated" album under the name Snoop Lion, and as of this posting, his 14th album, "Cool Aid", is set to be released on July 1, 2016, so that may or may not be included in this project, but we'll see how things go. I haven't played the likes of "Ego Trippin" and "Malice N Wonderland" really since I bought them, so it'll be interesting to see how I view them today, as well as "Doggumentary", an album I wasn't impressed with when it came out. I'll also be ranking (and rating) his albums throughout the project. So, with ALL of this being said, with further delay, I present to you THE Snoop Dogg project!!!!!



Release date: November 23, 1993



"Doggystyle was, we through with The Chronic, it's all about you Snoop. You the hottest thing coming out of the West Coast in a long time, and with Dre producing the album, from top to bottom, you can't lose." -Snoop, Welcome To Death Row (2001)


These spoken words by Snoop REALLY defined the hype going into this album, and when you add in his memorable "Deep Cover" debut and all of his lyrical contributions to the "Chronic" album, expectations were certainly high for "Doggystyle". Now, let's get the proverbial ball rolling!


PRODUCED BY
Dr. Dre

GUEST APPEARANCES BY
George Clinton
Dr. Dre
The Lady Of Rage
Tha Dogg Pound
RBX
Warren G
Nate Dogg
The Dramatics
Malik



1. "Bathtub"
We kick things off with Snoop doing the bath thing with a lady friend..... only to be interrupted by the ringing of his doorbell (can never get a moment to chill, lol), which then leads us to Snoop, apparently fully clothed at this point, lol, talking with Warren G. Snoop is contemplating getting out of the game in a "Superfly" influenced bit, and this LEADS US INTO.....


2. "G Funk Intro"

"It's time to get busy in this muthafucka/Like we always do about this time!!!!"


Wow, I still remember going absolutely crazy when I first heard this one, definitely one of the best intros I've ever heard, and I still chuckle a bit when I hear George Clinton say, "get your pooper scooper cause the nigga's talkin shit!" (LOL) Even though this is Snoop's album, they keep it in the Death Row family by really highlighting the Lady Of Rage and she comes fully equipped with such an ILL verse. The following four bars from Snoop effectively defines this "5 out of 5* intro and sets THE tone for what's to come:

"This is just a small introduction to the G Funk Era/Everyday of my life I take a glimpse in the mirror/And I see muthafuckas tryin to be like me/Every since I put it down with the D-R-E"



3. "Gin & Juice"


"Wit so much drama in the LBC/It's kinda hard being Snoop D-O-double G/But I, somehow someway/Keep comin up wit funky ass shit like every single day"


Those bars above are some of the most memorable in hip hop history.

Oh man, this CLASSIC takes me right back to my 4th grade year along with a nostalgic moment. When I was working on the essay I mentioned during the intro, when my computer teacher, Ms. Seaborn, was finishing up, I started to sing the hook to this song and right when I got to "smokin indo", she said, jokingly, "what you just say" and I quickly replied, "nothing", lol. But yes, this hit, the album's second single, confirmed the ultimate drink(s) for everyone at the time and was a key factor in how HOT Death Row was at this point. Snoop is SO laid back and funky on one of my favorite Dre tracks, definitely one of Snoop's best songs ever and the accompanying video remains entertaining to this day. A classic in every sense of the word.
*5 out of 5*



4. "W Balls"
This hilarious, Ricky Harris, aka DJ Suck T. Nutts (lol) led skit would lead to "W Balls", a "radio station", 187.4 on your FM dial, lol, being somewhat of a staple on future Snoop and Death Row releases. DJ Nutts, lol, brings us.....


5. "Tha Shiznit"

"You can't see the D-O-double G, cause that be me!"


True to its title, this banger was and still is the "shiznit", as Snoop brings us that "fly, gangsta shit" over a signature Dre production. TIGHT stuff here.
*5 out of 5*



6. Interlude
There's a game of Domino's going on at Snoop's crib, and this leads us to.....


7, "Lodi Dodi"

Snoop's West Coast styled remake of Slick Rick's classic "La-Di-Da-Di" has always been such a fly, smooth song to these ears. Yes, it's different from Rick's version, complete with a hilarious story told by Snoop, but as a tribute of sorts to Rick, this was more than acceptable.
*5 out of 5*



8. "Murder Was The Case"

Genius.com put it best when describing this song:

".....chronicles the fictional death of Snoop and his resurrection after making a deal with the devil."


Another classic to be sure, I liked Snoop's storytelling here all the way through, and Dat Nigga Daz (who will be referred to as "Daz" for the remainder of this project) did a very good job portraying the "devil." As you listen closely to the lyrics, not only has Snoop been resurrected, it's almost like he's still in the afterlife after making this deal, and promises to go straight after seeing where his street life activities led him. Quite powerful when you think about it and the ending more than gives you the impression a sequel was in order, but we sadly would never get that. (He would drop a DOPE remix to this which would appear on the soundtrack to the 18 minute movie of the same name and both versions will be posted below.)
*5 out of 5*




9. "Serial Killa"

"The cloud becomes black, the sky becomes blue/Now you in the midst of the Dogg Pound crew" -Snoop


Now THIS is what I'm talking about, some of that hardcore, Death Row gangsta shit that they were SO good at during this time, I mean this banger goes HARD indeed. Make no mistake about it, even though this is Snoop's show, Kurupt, Daz and RBX are showcased something proper here like Rage was on the "G Funk Intro."
*5 out of 5*



10. "(Who Am I) What's My Name?"



This would be the George Clinton/Parliament Funkadelic sampled first single, and man does this bring back memories, especially when I first heard the song and seen the video. It's apply titled 100 percent and if you didn't know who Snoop was after hearing this one, you didn't get it, lol. Don't let my somewhat lack of words full you here: this, much like "Gin & Juice", will always stand the test of time. Classic. (Oh yeah, I still laugh a bit when I hear Dre trying to rhyme "script" and "shit" and still managing to make it sound dope, lol.)
*5 out of 5*

"He is I and I am him, slim wit the titled brim/What's my muthafuckin name?!"



11. "For All My Niggaz and Bitches"

"Slow your roll, like ya legs was broken/Who's jokin, Rakim never joked so why should I loc?"/Now that's my idol, check the vital rhyme flow though/Runnin em like Flo Jo, stranded on Death Row" -Kurupt


Snoop takes a bit of a backseat here to let Kurupt, Daz and Rage catch wreck in a true, aggressive West Coast form. Granted, it's not as hard as "Serial Killa", but it's still hard nonetheless that's for sure.
*5 out of 5*



12. "Ain't No Fun (If the homies can't have none)"

Lol, even at a young age, I still remember tripping out when I heard Nate Dogg's opening verse for the first time. Simply put, this song is about one thing and one thing only: the, um, sharing of women, to put it mildly. Now, I never took this seriously, but it was always hilariously entertaining, featuring some key "laugh out loud" lines from Kurupt ("Well if Kurupt gave a fuck about a bitch, I'd always be broke/I'd never have no muthafuckin indo to smoke") and Snoop ("Guess who's back in the muthafuckin house/Wit a fat dick for yo muthafuckin mouth"), lol. I'm sure a song like this made C. Deloris Tucker (God rest her soul) lose huge amounts of sleep, lol.
*5 out of 5*



13. "Interlude 2"
Lol, Snoop's "chronic break" is quite the funny moment, where he famously says, "I'll tell a bitch like this, bitch, you without me is like Harold Melvin without the Blue Notes, you'll never go Platinum!" Lol.


14. "Doggy Dogg World"



Man, this joint right here. Allow me to talk about the song first. Snoop's opening verse starts off in the smoothest way possible, followed by a DOPE Kurupt verse where he manages to kill it in such a fashion that you ALMOST forget how laid back and smooth the song is and I can't forget Daz's good verse as well as the guest spot by the legendary Dramatics, simply great stuff here. Speaking of great, that brings me to the video, which I just named as my #3 favorite video of all time. As an "80s baby", it was also an honor to be exposed to the Blaxploitation films of the 70s around this same time, so seeing the likes of Fred Williamson, Pam Grier (I KNOW Dre felt like a king sitting next to her during this video, lol), Rudy Ray Moore (RIP), Ron O'Neal (RIP), Antonio Fargas, and Fred "Rerun" Berry (RIP) brings back memories to this day and the only person missing was Richard Roundtree, better known as "Shaft." Not only is this a classic, but it's rated "AG", All Good.
*5 out of 5*



15. Interlude 3
Apparently a young Bow Wow played the role of a young Snoop, who "wanted to be a muthafuckin hustla, you betta ask somebody!" Lol.


16. "Gz And Hustlas" 

"This is for the Gz and this is for the hustlas/This is for the hustlas, now back to the Gz"


Now, I just checked out an interview courtesy of hotnewhiphop.com. In the midst of talking about this album, as well as its 20th anniversary at the time, Snoop said that this entire song was a freestyle ("on that mic check, I freestyled, and whatever came out is the record you heard", he said). Whether that's the case or not, this is still such a dope song and Snoop pretty much kills it from start to finish.
*5 out of 5*



17. "Interlude 4"
This takes a page out of "The Mack" playbook. At four interludes on this album, none of them overstayed their welcome.


18. "Gz Up, Hoes Down"

"Bitch please, you know how we do the undercover/I'm Snoop Doggy Dogg, not your average muthafucka, see"


A few facts about this one. 1) This would later be deleted from all copies after the original pressing due to sample and clearance issues and, 2) it was listed on the back cover after "Pump Pump" instead of before. Either way, this Issac Hayes sampled song, courtesy of "The Look of Love", is short, sweet and to the point. 
*5 out of 5*



19. "Pump Pump"

This high powered closer featured a SICK production by Dre, two dope verses from Snoop and a nice closing verse by Lil Malik, a cousin of Snoop and also known as 1/2 of the short lived duo Illegal (Malik almost steals the show here too). You couldn't have asked for a much better close to this incredible album, definitely leaves you wanting more.
*5 out of 5*




Whew, ok, we can get the obvious out of the way first, lol! With EVERY song clocking in at a "5 out of 5" rating and it being my #9 favorite album of all time, it's NO question/debate that this is a 5 star classic,  one of 1993's best albums and if there was an album (a debut mind you) that solidified the status of an artist, it's this one. Lyrically, Snoop was REALLY on top of his game, which wasn't hard to do considering his was coming off of the aforementioned "Deep Cover" and "The Chronic." Post-Doggystyle, he would have his moments, but this may (or may not) be his lyrical peak right here. All of the Death Row inmates shined as well, especially Tha Dogg Pound and Rage and it was clear who was next in line. The production, man, what can I say?! Dre was STILL on fire at this point and I simply love his production on this album. One of the key reasons I love it so much is due to how different each beat was and the sound FIT Snoop very well, plus it was different from what was displayed on "The Chronic", which itself had equally DOPE ass production. In addition, driven by three successful singles in the form of "Gin & Juice" (which was nominated for a 1995 Grammy Award for "Best Rap Solo Performance" and achieving Certified Gold status), "What's My Name" and "Doggy Dogg World", to say this album was a success is a total understatement (Gin & Juice still receives radio play in my area). Snoop was the first artist in the modern era whose very first album went #1, currently sitting at a deserved Quadruple Platinum status. And did I also mention how dope the cover art, front and inside, was, lol? Needless to say, this will always remain Snoop's BEST album from top to bottom.


1. Doggystyle (5 stars)


And from here, we head to 1996 and his sophomore album, "Tha Doggfather", his first album in almost 3 years after "Doggystyle." Another understatement would be that things had drastically changed for Snoop (and Death Row for that matter) when '96 arrived. But rewinding things back for a bit, after "Doggystyle", Snoop remained on such an incredible roll, a true bright spot on the West Coast hip hop scene for the remainder of '93 and all of '94. Even though he was still a top star and largely in the public eye, behind the scenes things weren't so lovely unfortunately. It wasn't too long after the release of his debut that he and his bodyguard were charged with the murder of Phillip Woldemariam in what was a deemed a gang related shooting. While '95 saw Snoop doing his thing, notably being there for Tha Dogg Pound's "Dogg Food" debut, he mostly spent his time in court, and thankfully he and his bodyguard were cleared/acquitted of all charges (it turned out to be a case of self defense) in February of '96. Snoop's career would continue, but things weren't getting any better. Changes were the order of the day at Death Row Records that year, most notably Dre's departure (he would have no role on this album), the label's slipping momentum, as well as the arrival and untimely death of Tupac Shakur. All of these factors would play a role in Snoop's second album.


Release date: November 12, 1996


1. "Intro"
This intro captures an audio shot of Snoop's life at this point, plus an "FU" to those "who said gangsta rap was dead", leading us into.....


2. "Doggfather"
Featuring Charlie Wilson
Produced by Daz



Right off the bat, you can tell Snoop sounds very different from his "Doggystyle" days and quite frankly, he still sounds this way today, even at his age, respectively. He still comes smooth and gangsta with it (check the name "Doggfather" being a play on "Godfather"). Charlie Wilson does the hook and we'll be hearing from him a lot more on this album (and the rest of this project for that matter).
*3.5 out of 5*



3. "Ride 4 Me"
Nothing but a skit here, a pointless one at that.


4. "Up Jump Tha Boogie"
Featuring Kurupt
Produced by DJ Pooh

The album insert incorrectly lists Charlie Wilson and Teena Marie as being on this song, so someone screwed up BIG TIME there. As for this song, the West Coast vibe does make you want to boogie. Decent song.
*3 out of 5*


5. "Freestyle Conversation"
Produced by Priest "Soopafly" Brooks

This may be the first time I'm calling a song "slight appropriately titled." Snoop is doing more conversating than freestyling here and it shows. The most notable thing coming out of this song is that producer Soopafly would collaborate with Snoop on some of his later albums. 
*2 out of 5*


6. "When I Grow Up"
This takes another page out of "The Mack" playbook.


7. "Snoop Bounce"
Featuring Charlie Wilson
Produced by DJ Pooh

This is just another song that happens to sample Roger Troutman's classic "More Bounce To The Ounce." I mean, it's fairly decent, but something is missing that prevents it from being more than decent.
*3 out of 5*


8. "Gold Rush"
Featuring Kurupt and L.B.C. Crew
Produced by Arkim and Flair

The sounds of "Western styled" hip hop was very present in '96 and this may/may not have been the first from the West. With that said, for a "heist for the gold" on record, this was ok, but clearly nothing special.
*2.5 out of 5*


9. "(Tear 'Em Off) Me And My Doggz"
Produced by L.T.

Snoop shows mad love to his dogs, quite literally, nothing more.
*3 out of 5*


10. "You Thought"
Featuring Too $hort and Soopafly
Produced by Soopafly

Straight pimp shit, and when there's a song like this present, you won't find $hort too far behind.
*3 out of 5*


11. "Vapors"
Produced by DJ Pooh



The album insert also INCORRECTLY lists Charlie Wilson and Teena Marie featured on this. What the HELL is up with that, smh+lol? Anyway, some hip hop life has finally been breathed into this album with this dope yet underrated remake of Biz Markie's classic of the same name. Even Snoop sounds like he's having fun. Just watch and listen......
*5 out of 5*



12. "Groupie"
Featuring Tha Dogg Pound, Warren G, Nate Dogg and Charlie Wilson
Produced by Daz

For starters, no way should Charlie Wilson have been on this song considering the content, so I'm taking points off for that. Without no further elaboration, this apply titled song finds the men talking about "groupies" and how they're treated.
*2.5 out of 5*


13. "2001"
Produced by DJ Pooh

And before you ask, the odd title here does NOT suggest anything close to a precursor to Dre's album of the same name in '99. In fact, I'm not sure what Snoop was going for here, but it's another fairly decent song.
*3 out of 5*


14. "Sixx Minutes"
Produced by Arkim and Flair

A smooth little banger right here, with a slight West Coast twist on another classic, this time in the form of Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick's "The Show." It doesn't quite hit the "6 minute" mark, but it works.
*4 out of 5*



15. "(O.J.) Wake Up"
Featuring Tray Dee
Produced by Snoop and L.T.

I did not feel this apparent remake of Run-DMC's classic "It's Like That", and "this shit here gonna be bigger than the OJ case", um, no. Let's move on.
*2 out of 5*


16. "Snoop's Upside Ya Head"
Featuring Charlie Wilson
Produced by DJ Pooh



I do remember not liking this all that much when I first heard it, but time has been kind to it in a way and it was a good choice for the album's first single (and Charlie Wilson was not out of place on this one). 
*4 out of 5*



17. "Blueberry"
Featuring Tha Dogg Pound and L.B.C. Crew
Produced by Sam Sneed

I'm not sure why this was titled "Blueberry", but it doesn't serve as a distraction to an otherwise tight song. Snoop steps back a bit to allow additional shine for Daz, Kurupt and the L.B.C. Crew (Rage should've been on this one too). Also, bump this one in your whip while you're riding at night.
*4 out of 5*



18. "Traffic Jam"
A "W Balls" skit to lead us into....


19. "Doggyland"
Produced by DJ Pooh

I guess Snoop was going for the "fun" route here, but it misses the mark.
*2 out of 5*


20. "Downtown Assassins"
Featuring Daz and Tray Dee
Produced by Daz

As we prepare to close "Tha Doggfather", this would likely be the hardest song on the album after "Blueberry."
*3.5 out of 5*


21. "Outro"
A live audio clip of Pac serves as the album's outro.



Ok, compared to the classic "Doggystyle", this was a huge step down on all levels, specifically the lyrics and production. I'll give Snoop the benefit of the doubt because so much was going on in his life, personally and professionally in '96, but as an album, this is underwhelming with somewhat of a staggering amount of filler. Everything that made "Doggystyle" SO good was missing completely on this album. When you think of the hit singles from his debut, the title track, "Snoop's Upside Ya Head" and "Vapors" received only a small bit of hype, radio and TV play compared to those. If it wasn't for those three songs as well as "Blueberry" and "Sixx Minutes", this album would've died a slow, painful death, but thankfully that didn't happen. Snoop was still a big enough star heading into '97 that album number two debuted at #1 on the charts, moving a respectable 479,000 units in its first week, hitting the Double Platinum mark. Not too long after this, Snoop would keep somewhat of a low profile in '97, but he would make some "Southern changes" as '98 arrived. Oh, I'm going with a 2.5 star rating for "Doggfather."


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Doggfather" (2.5 stars)


UPDATE: "Tha Doggfather" rating has been bumped to a soild 3 star rating.


The next part of this project will be taken verbatim from my post on July 3, 2015, with new thoughts in bold of course.



Loyal reader, I'm sure you recall me talking about how much of a No Limit fan I was back in the day, specifically during my 8th and 9th grade (school) years. After that, the albums were no longer a part of my collection, but within recent times, outside of when I did a few posts on the blog several months ago, I've found myself revisiting some of those albums, even adding Young Bleed's "My Balls And My Word" and Mystikal's "Unpredictable" back to my collection for the first time in 16 years. Will I add more back? We shall see. (Since then, I've re-added quite a few more No Limit albums back to my collection.)

The album I'm going to cover today, somewhat out of the blue, is Snoop Dogg's debut for the label, the lengthy titled "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told", but first a little backstory. Previously, Snoop was a part of Death Row Records, and circa 1996, the label was crumbling before our very eyes. Dr. Dre left in the middle part of the year, 2Pac was murdered in September, etc, so this left the once powerful label in straight turmoil, and with Suge Knight being sentenced to prison months later for violating his parole, Death Row as we once knew it was no more. Furthermore, Snoop released his second and last Death Row album, "Tha Doggfather", on November 12th of the same year. To say this album was LEAST anticipated unlike his debut "Doggystyle" would be a total understatement, for a variety of reasons. Needless to say, it was time for Snoop to take his career to the next level or the end (to his career) would be near. (Talk about telling the story again, lol.) And then Master P came calling, who was able to get him out of his Death Row contract and onto the tank (and removing "Doggy" from his name in the process). Prior to his signing, Snoop made a few guest appearances on No Limit albums, which you can check out below:






Looking back, was it inevitable that Snoop was going to sign with No Limit? That's a very interesting question that has never been asked until now and quite frankly it could've went either way. Although this album was first promoted in the insert of Fiend's "There's One In Every Family", I first saw it while flipping through an issue of The Source, and I couldn't believe what I was seeing because I literally had no idea he had signed. From there, he made more No Limit guest appearances, all leading to his third album. I haven't played this album in SUCH a long time and it'll be very interesting to see if it has aged well or not. Let's get right to it!


Release date: August 4, 1998



All songs produced by Beats By The Pound, except where noted
*Produced By DJ Pooh
**Produced By DJ Darryl
***Produced By MP (Master P)
#Produced By Meech Wells
$Produced By Snoop Dogg
^Produced By Soopafly


1. "Snoop World"
Featuring Master P
Produced By KLC

 This opener would've had that much more impact had Snoop not made any previous guest appearances and instead this would've been the very first thing you heard since his signing, but you know what, either way it's all good. Snoop sounded at home over the southern styled, thumping beat provided by KLC, plus he was already embracing No Limit hip hop home. Oh yeah, P's verse was not needed, as this opener should've just been Snoop by himself.
*3.5 out of 5*


2. "Slow Down"
Featuring Mia X, O'Dell and Anita Thomas
Produced By O'Dell

 The first of many interpolations on this album comes from Loose Ends classic "Slow Down", which gave this one a smooth feeling from start to finish. 
*4 out of 5*


3. "Woof!"
Featuring Mystikal and Fiend
Produced by Craig B and MP



Only Snoop can sound so laid back alongside the rowdy/amped stylings of Fiend and Mystikal, lol. This joint has always been called one of the best songs on the album, and who can argue with that. Tight stuff here.
*5 out of 5*




4. "Gin & Juice II"
Produced By Carlos Stephens

Ok, let's talk about this one for a moment. If anything, I've always heard this song completely dumped on because Snoop needlessly, according to some, attempted to remake one of his classics. First off, in no way was this even remotely a remake, this is more of an ode than anything else. Of course it holds no candle to its predecessor, but if you accept it for it is/was and nothing more, it comes off as a good song.
*4 out of 5*


*5. "Show Me Love"
Additional Vocals By Charlie Wilson

Although Snoop and Mr. Wilson would go on to make better songs than this one, what we got here was not too bad (in terms of a song for the ladies), but not too memorable either.
*3 out of 5*


6. "Hustle & Ball"
Produced By O'Dell

"What's my name? Snoop Dogg? And what I like to do? I like to hustle and ball!" -Snoop


Well, those lines above tell you all you need to know about this song, nothing more or less.
*3 out of 5*


**7. "Don't Let Go"  

 It seemed like Snoop was going for a message here, but it simply turned into just another song, another decent one, nothing more honestly.
*3 out of 5*


8. "Tru Tank Doggs"
Featuring Mystikal
Produced By KLC

Man, the way I BUMPED this joint back in '98 you would think it was a banger, lol, but revisiting it now, it's good but not great. Then again, if this was Mystikal's song (by himself), it would've been that much better in my view. My rating for this is largely due to Mystikal's verse and KLC's beat (Snoop's verse was ok).
*3.5 out of 5*


***9. "Whatcha Gon Do?
Featuring Master P

This totally could've been left on the cutting room floor and with all due respect to P, this seemed like an excuse for him to make another guest appearance. It won't be his last on this album.
*2 out of 5*


#10. "Still A G Thang"



I've always thought this was a dope first single and I have the same views like "Gin & Juice II." This doesn't come anywhere close to the classic "Nuthin But A G Thang", but as an ode to a classic, Snoop does a fine job over Meech Wells' production, probably the second best song on the album after "Woof!". In a nice touch, I like how Snoop reached out to Dre at the end of the last verse and their reunion would take place, albeit a year later for Dre's "2001" album.
*4 out of 5*

(Pardon me for the mistake, but Dre and Snoop did reconnect months before the "2001" album dropped. Dre was behind the boards on 3 songs from the "No Limit Top Dogg" album. And yes there was more to come.)




***11. "20 Dollars To My Name
Featuring Fiend, Soulja Slim and Silkk The Shocker

In one of the most creative No Limit songs you'll ever hear, Snoop, Fiend, Slim (RIP) and Silkk talk about what it's like to be down to their last $20 and their plans with said money, but looking back, these cats had paper so it'll be hard to imagine them coming down to their last few dollars, lol. All involved dropped good verses, and yes that does include Silkk.
*4 out of 5*




#12. "D.O.G.'s Get Lonely 2"
Additional Vocals By Jon B.

Snoop comes through with another one for the ladies. It's not bad, but not that good either. And did he really say "I'm not that much of a rapper" in the middle of the song??? Come on Snoop. Let's move on shall we.
*2 out of 5*


13. "Ain't Nut'in Personal"
Featuring C-Murder and Silkk The Shocker
Additional Vocals By Crooked I (Steady Mobb'n)
Produced By Craig B

 "Ain't nothin personal, it's all about respect" -Crooked I


Nino Brown once said in New Jack City, "it's always business, never personal", and in even in the No Limit way, that applies here. Snoop and C-Murder work Craig B's track like a charm, while Silkk did the complete opposite, even sounding like he had a cold or something (lol). Now when I think about it, a combination of Snoop, C and Magic, who didn't appear on this album, would've been better for this one.
*3.5 out of 5*


14. "DP Gangsta"
Featuring C-Murder
Additional Vocals By Eddie Griffin

The only issue I had with this song is that Eddie Griffin's words added nothing to an otherwise very good song. Snoop assumes Ice Cube's role and C plays Eazy-E, effectively creating the No Limit version of N.W.A.'s classic "Gangsta Gangsta." Craig B, the most underrated member of Beats By The Pound, now known as the Medicine Men, effectively reworked Dre (and Yella's) original beat 10 years later.
*4 out of 5*




15. "Game Of Life"
Featuring Steady Mobb'n
Produced By Carlos Stephens

Crooked I and Billy Bathgate, collectively known as Steady Mobb'nhad been with No Limit since 1997 at this point, and coming from the Ghost Town section of West Oakland, California, the connection with Snoop (representing Long Beach) was all but imminent. Featuring a (slightly) bass driven track with an interpolation of Whodini's "Five Minutes Of Funk", another classic, this was a West Coast winner, by way of the South.
 *4 out of 5*




#16. "See Ya When I Get There"
Featuring C-Murder and Mystikal

We have all heard songs like this before, with artists making a dedication to those who are no longer with us, family and friends, and when done right, they're usually very good and we get that here. (Mystikal said "this thing we call life ain't nothin but a phase.")
*4 out of 5*


$17. "Pay For P...."
Featuring Big Pimp'n

Clocking in at 1:43, I'm sure you remember Big Pimp'n from the Death Row days. He has some "pimpin" words for us all.


18. "Picture This"
Featuring Mia X
Produced By Craig B

This Mia X assisted song was both hard and smooth at the same time, especially due to the beat provided by Craig B.
*4 out of 5*


19. "Doggz Gonna Get Ya"
Additional Vocals By Mac
Produced By KLC

Snoop did a damn good job remaking BDP's classic "Love's Gonna Get Ya". KLC equally reworked the 1990 styled track with a '98 touch. Good stuff here.
*4 out of 5*




^20. "Hoes, Money & Clout"
 Scratches By Daz

This was the only song on the album that had the most "West Coast" sound of all 21 songs. The title itself would tell you the subject is nothing new for Snoop. An ok song.
*3 out of 5*


21. "Get Bout It & Rowdy"
Featuring Master P
Produced By KLC

I appreciated an updated version of "Bout It, Bout It", in terms of the beat, but this was somewhat of an anti-climatic closer, and the yelling from P (you know what I'm talking about, lol) didn't help this song at all.
*2 out of 5*



Ok, before I get to my overall thoughts on this album, I want to address a few things first, starting with Snoop's move to No Limit. Now, based on what I remember, the reaction to it, while a major story at the time, was largely mixed. With hindsight being 20/20, when you think back to where his career was as '96 ended, this was a move that Snoop had to make. I mean, where else was he going to go? Aftermath with Dre? Possibly, but it took a while for Dre's label to take off the way it did, and really that happened when he signed Eminem. So if you ask me, signing with No Limit, even for a few years, was a good move in retrospect. He made more appearances on other No Limit albums that were released in the latter part of '98, dropped the excellent "No Limit Top Dogg" in 99 (the next part of this project) and his last No Limit album, "Tha Last Meal", in 2000. Overall, his tenure at the label was a success, and even if Snoop was a little too laid back for No Limit, he still made it work.


And finally, my thoughts on the album. I've often heard this referred to as Snoop's worst album, with some citing it being recorded in 3 weeks as justification, and after revisiting it, I respectively disagree. While it holds NO candle to "Doggystyle" and is probably not even better than "Tha Doggfather" (another revisit?), (My rankings will tell the updated story here.) I'd take this over anything he's done after "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (then again nothing on this album can touch "I Wanna Rock" from the "Malice N Wonderland" album, as well as the remix). (We'll see about this, lol.) The first half was up and down, but it really picked up steam in the second. This 3.5 star album, up from my initial 3 stars, confirmed that Snoop was able to take his largely laid back, smooth West Coast sound and merge it effectively with the bouncy workings of the South, and it deserved the success it achieved (it moved 520,000 units in its first week, 246,000 in the second, leading to a Double Platinum certification later in '98). Very good album here and it's not as bad as you may have been led to believe.


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
3. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)






Release date: May 11, 1999


1. "Dolomite Intro"
Much like he did on Busta Rhymes' "When Disaster Strikes", Rudy Ray Moore comes through with a spoken word intro for us all, in true Dolo/Dolemite fashion. It's quite the segue into.....


2. "Buck 'Em"
Featuring Sticky Fingaz
Produced by Dr. Dre

"As soon as the bass hits your dome, Snoop Dogg grabs the chrome/And gets in your system, shootin off rhymes like a pistol"


Yes, this opening starts things off in such a bangin way, the first time that Snoop had rocked on a Dre production in nearly 5 years. Snoop came through with 2 good verses, add in a Sticky Fingaz led hook and you got yourself a winner.
*5 out of 5*



3. "Trust Me"
Featuring Sylk E. Fine and Suga Free
Produced by Bud'da

Simply put, this is more "pimp shit" right here, nothing more. I didn't care about this one, mainly because I've never been a fan of Sylk E. Fine and Suga Free. Let's quickly move on.
*2 out of 5*


4. "My Heat Goes Boom"
Produced by Meech Wells

Snoop comes with the heat on this one, and whether it's lyrical or otherwise, it gets the job done. Meech Wells was kind of an underrated producer in his day.
*4 out of 5*



5. "Dolomite"
Mr. Moore with some more words for us all, lol.


6. "Snoopafella"
Produced by Ant Banks

Snoop tells a funny little story as the "ultra male" version of Cinderella, going by "Cinderfella" for this one, lol. I also liked how Ant Banks brought such a West Coast vibe to Brick's classic "Dazz."
*4 out of 5*




7. "In Love With A Thug"
Produced by Meech Wells


Granted, we have all heard "gangsta love songs", but it's something about this that sounded so fresh coming from Snoop.
*3.5 out of 5*


8. "G Bedtime Stories"
Produced by Meech Wells




 I thought it was a little odd for Snoop to make a video for this one in '99. The song is decent, but considering what Snoop was capable of in the storytelling department, this fell short. And now when I think about it, I feel if he would've remade another Slick Rick classic, in this case "Children's Story", the results would've been much different (imagine the West Coast spin he would've put on that like "Lodi Dodi").
*3 out of 5*


9. "Down For My N's"
Featuring C-Murder and Magic
Produced by KLC




Oh man, THIS banger right here. In a summer that was dominated by Cash Money Records, in terms of Southern hip hop, this joint made lots of noise at the time and I believe this is the ONLY No Limit song to this day that graces any radio stations. You would think a song like this would be too rowdy for the usually laid back Snoop, but again he flows so well and there's no awkward feeling at all. This appropriately titled song still bangs today and is probably the last true NL anthem, such a great job by all involved. (RIP Magic)
*5 out of 5*




10. "Betta Days"
Produced by Meech Wells and Def Jeff

When you reflect on the past and analyze the present, depending on your daily activities, there's certainly hope for better days and time heading into the future. Good song.
*4 out of 5*


11. "Somethin Bout Yo Bidness"
Featuring and produced by Raphael Saadiq

This is a mellow one for the ladies, complete with the feature and production by Raphael Saadiq. Not bad.
*3 out of 5*


12. "Bitch Please"
Featuring Xzibit and Nate Dogg
Produced by Dr. Dre




After producing one banger in the form of "Buck 'Em", Dre supplies Snoop and guests X to the Z and Nate Dogg some more heat. In addition to "Down 4 My N's", this one also made noise in '99 and it remains such a dope song, and every time they performed this live, especially in '99, they usually delivered a great performance. A West Coast classic.
*5 out of 5*




13. "Doin' Too Much"
Produced by DJ Quik

It may be a little too late now, but I've said for a while that it would've been something if Snoop and Quik teamed up for a collaborative album. Can you imagine Snoop over nothing but Quik production? Man, the possibilities. If this apply titled song was any indication, a Snoop/Quik album would've been VERY good.
*4 out of 5*




14. "Gangsta Ride"
Featuring Silkk The Shocker
Produced by Meech Wells

Not to be too serious about it, but there wasn't too much that was gangsta about this song. Silkk surprisingly didn't bring this down with an insipid verse, but overall it's decent.
*3 out of 5*


15. "Ghetto Symphony"
Featuring Mia X, Fiend, C-Murder, Silkk The Shocker, Mystikal and Goldie Loc
Produced by KLC

As a NL remake of the Juice Crew All Stars CLASSIC "The Symphony", this was largely very good, and keep in mind not everyone can create a worthy remake of such a classic. KLC brought a true Southern twist on the production side, while Snoop, Mia, Mystikal, Fiend, C-Murder and Goldie Loc held things down on the mic. And going back to Silkk again, facepalm+lol, why include him on this one? His verse temporarily halts the momentum of an otherwise very good song. If you have a lineup consisting on Snoop, Mia, Mystikal, Fiend, C-Murder, Goldie Loc and the other half of Tha Eastsidaz, Tray Dee, this would've been an easy "5 out of 5." Minus Silkk's verse, this is still dope.
*4.5 out of 5*




16. "Party With A D.P.G."
Produced by Jelly Roll

The "replayed elements" of Earth, Wind & Fire's "Shining Star" was cool, but outside of that, as evident by the title, this is nothing we haven't heard before while still being an ok song.
*3 out of 5*


17. "Buss'n Rocks"
Produced by DJ Quik

A good song, proving again that Snoop and Quik had very good chemistry which would've translated well to an album.
*4 out of 5*




18. "Just Dippin"
Featuring Dr. Dre and Jewell
Produced by Dr. Dre

It feels like the Death Row days once again, featuring Dre and Snoop on the same track for the first time since '93 I believe, predating "Still D.R.E." by a few months. Jewell comes through towards the end in a nice touch. Another good song.
*4 out of 5*




19. "Don't Tell"
Featuring Warren G, Mauseburg and Nate Dogg
Produced by DJ Quik

Creeping with the opposite sex is the clear theme here, nothing more needs to be said. Quik's production fits the occasion that's for sure.
*2 out of 5*


20. "20 Minutes"
Featuring and produced by Goldie Loc

If you ask me, the purpose of this song was to put some focus on Goldie Loc, however, Snoop comes with two verses of his own (nothing wrong with that). Decent.
*3 out of 5*


21. "I Love My Momma"
Produced by Meech Wells

For obvious reasons, I tend to love songs like this considering my own relationship with my mom, and it's an emotional way to close this album with Snoop's dedication to his mom. (And apparently, an uncredited Lenny Williams appears on this one.)
*5 out of 5*





I've always thought this was somewhat of a return to form for Snoop, in addition to it being a VERY good album, his best since "Doggystyle." When Snoop is inspired, accompanied by solid production to match, the results usually speak for themselves, especially when he reunited with Dr. Dre. Whereas the (hit) singles on the previous two albums didn't make that much noise, "Bitch Please" and "Down 4 My N's" lit up the scene in '99 and sold this album. Speaking of which, NLTD debuted at #2 on the "Billboard 200" chart, moving 187,400 units in its first week, with 1,518,000 total units moved as of March 2008 for a Platinum certification. Going forward, Snoop's albums would have a variety, if you will, of guest appearances, but you won't forget who the actual star of the show is. 4.5 stars for "No Limit Top Dogg."



1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
3. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
4. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)



Before we head into 2000's "Tha Last Meal", I want to comment on something that has been touched on the blog before. In promotion of this album, I specifically recall Snoop saying that, while it would be his last album on No Limit, "this would be the last time these record labels eat off me." To this day, I'm still not sure if that was a subtle (or not so subtle) departing shot at Master P (which would've been incredibly odd because I don't recall those two ever having tension) or if it was directed at Priority, the distributor of No Limit albums. He would later form Doggystyle Records (and bring back the dope album artwork, lol).




Release date: December 19, 2000


1. "Intro"
This was a fitting Dre produced, Ohio Players sampled ("I Want To Be Free") intro to start the proceedings.


2. "Heenesey N Buddah"
Featuring Kokane, Background Vocals by Traci Nelson
Produced by Dr. Dre and Michael Elizondo

I don't ever recall this one being released as a single, but it's all good. During the making of this song, I could picture Snoop having the choice of smoke & brew present, lol. In addition, he just sounds so inspired/at home over Dre's production, no surprise there.
*4 out of 5*




3. "Snoop Dogg (what's my name pt. 2)"
Background Vocals by The Lady of Rage and Nate Dogg
Produced by Timbaland




Now, it goes without saying that this second part to his classic of the same name is not better, however, it's really catchy and Snoop flows so well over the signature Timbaland production. I believe this may have been their first time collaborating, and it was quite the surprise at the time, much like when he first hooked up with another name that I will go into more on the next album.
*4 out of 5*




4. "True Lies"
Featuring Kokane
Produced by Dr. Dre and Michael Elizondo

Part of me wants to say there's more to the story here when Kokane asks "what's the use of the truth if you can't tell a lie sometimes", the other part of me simply wants to enjoy this joint for the laid back vibes provided throughout. I bet this is another one that would sound so good in the ride at night.
*4 out of 5*




5. "Wrong Idea"
Featuring Bad Azz, Kokane and Lil HD
Produced by Jelly Roll

I liked the interpolation of Cameo's classic "Single Life" for the hook. Another good song here, and what I gather is that they're saying, "don't get the wrong idea, I'm just being me and doing what I do." (Interestingly enough, this song was also featured on Bad Azz's debut album "Personal Business.")
*4 out of 5*




6. "Go Away"

Featuring Kokane
Produced by Meech Wells

A lot of Kokane on this album to be sure, thus far, lol. This is about as apply titled as you can get, plus Snoop interestingly repeats the first verse in the closing third one, not much more to say about this.
*2.5 out of 5*


7. "Set It Off"
Featuring MC Ren, The Lady of Rage, Nate Dogg and Ice Cube
Produced by Timbaland

Speaking of apply titled, that's certainly the case here, as we get a lineup of West Coast all stars to blaze a dope Timbaland production. Snoop and Ren come with dope verses, but I feel Rage steals the show on this one with such ill lines as usual (quite the underrated femcee). Also, even though he threw in a few words at the end, I'm not sure why Kurupt (and Daz for that matter) didn't spit a verse here, it would've been welcomed.
*5 out of 5*




8. "Stacey Adams"
Featuring Kokane
Produced by Battlecat

Ah, Kokane returns again, lol. This joint is just as laid back as "True Lies."
*4 out of 5*




9. "Lay Low"
Featuring Master P, Nate Dogg, Butch Cassidy and Tha Eastsidaz 
Produced by Dr. Dre and Michael Elizondo




A highly tight slice of West Coast dopeness right here. This one received a bit of airplay at the time, but not much surprisingly because it's quite the dope (underrated) song. Everyone brings their A game, especially Nate who kills it on the hook, and even Master P wasn't out of place here.
*5 out of 5*




10. "Bring It On"
Featuring Suga Free and Kokane
Produced by Jelly Roll, Co-Produced by Clarence "Jimmy" Roach

As mentioned during the "No Limit Top Dogg" portion, I'm not a fan of Suga Free, but much to my surprise, he wasn't that bad on this one, and yes, we get MORE Kokane, lol. That's not knock on him, lol, and while he's no Nate Dogg, he does good on the hook with his own unique style. Decent song.
*3 out of 5*


11. "Game Court" (Skit)
Featuring Mac Minista
Produced by Studio Tone
The notable thing about this skit is Tone's TIGHT interpolation of the "People's Court" theme.



12. "Issues"
Produced by Meech Wells

I can imagine all of the issues Snoop has had in the game over the years. He put all of those issues on blast and then some here, all bars and no hook.
*4 out of 5*


13. "Brake Fluid (biittch pump yo brakes)"
Featuring Kokane
Produced by Scott Storch

Well, Snoop has made it no secret that he has multiple women..... coming after him and otherwise I guess, lol. It seems like he and Kokane were going for laughs here, but as it stands, the song is ok. (This was also begging for a Too $hort guest appearance if you ask me.)
*3 out of 5*


14. "Ready 2 Ryde"
Featuring Eve
Produced by Scott Storch

Doggystyle and Ruff Ryders connect, and while an Eve appearance on a Snoop song may seem out of nowhere, they actually do a decent job on this one. (Also towards the end, Snoop throws a shoutout to DMX, and yes, I hoped we would get a collabo between them at some point.)
*3 out of 5*


15. "Loosen Control"
Featuring Butch Cassidy and Soopafly
Produced by Soopafly

This was another for the ladies, less for the fellas this time around. It was released as a single with an accompanying video, but it didn't make that much noise.
*3 out of 5*


16. "I Can't Swim"
Produced by Jelly Roll and Casey Wilson

Snoop was strictly spitting West Coast game here for the most part, nothing we haven't heard before at this point.
*3 out of 5*


17. "Leave Me Alone"
Produced by Battlecat

Snoop has no time for the haters and naysayers, even expressing this in somewhat of a singing form here (lol).
*2 out of 5*


18. "Back Up Off Me"
Featuring Master P and Mr. Magic
Produced by Carlos Stephens

Other than this being your standard No Limit fare, the only thing I have to say (about the song) is that Magic had the best verse. Also, those familiar with the NL sound would recall this song, in terms of the production and hook, essentially remakes "Where You From", which featured P, Silkk and, uh, Skull Duggery, probably as a way to stick it to Craig B, 1/4 for the Beats By The Pound production team who left the label and re-emerged as the Medicine Men. Check out both of these and judge for yourself.
*2.5 out of 5*






19. "Y'all Gone Miss Me"
Featuring Kokane
Produced by Scott Storch

This excellent closer could be interpreted in a few different ways. 1) At the very beginning of this song, it really does sound like this was Snoop's swan song, but as you listen on, that's not the case. 2) The first verse sounds like he's giving up his "old ways" and moving on in a new direction. 3) The second verse finds him giving a farewell shoutout to the NL crew. 4) He's looking ahead to the future with his DoggHouse/Doggystyle imprint. Very good song.
*4 out of 5*





After listening to this one again, I feel it's safe to say that while it's a very good, 4 star album (down from my previous 4.5 rating), overall, I don't think this is better than "No Limit Top Dogg." Granted, there are quite a few quality songs on "Tha Last Meal", but compared to the likes of "Buck Em", "Down 4 My N's", and "Bitch Please", just to name three, nothing on this album comes close to those, even if there are two or three songs that give those a run for their money. Plus I can't ignore the fact that after such a strong first half, the quality dips quite a bit after "Lay Low" and thankfully the album ends on an excellent note instead of an anti-climatic one. Singles such as "Loosin Control", "Lay Low", "Wrong Idea", and "Snoop Dogg (what's my name pt. 2)" made a respectable amount of noise at the time, but again compared to previous hit singles from Snoop, they didn't sustain any momentum as far as radio and TV were concerned and that was pretty much it after said singles left rotation. In addition, there's no way this album couldn't be looked at as a success. It debuted at #9 on the "Billboard 200", moving 397,238 units in its first week, later achieving a Double Platinum certification in excess of 2,068,000 units sold (and the fact that this was promoted as Snoop's final No Limit album may have boosted the sales a bit). From here, we head to 2002 and Snoop's 6th album.


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
3. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
4. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
5. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)






Release date: November 26, 2002


1. "Don Doggy"
This "mob style" intro takes us into.....


2. "Da Bo$$ Would Like To See You"
Produced by E-Swift

Well, in full "izzle" mode, lol, Snoop is now a boss as this one proclaims. I wouldn't consider this an actual song, therefore it gets no rating.


3. "Stoplight"
Produced by Jelly Roll

For starters, there are quite a few names on the hook/vocals: Jelly Roll, Mamie Gunn, Vorheez, Quaze (Stanley Harris), Mr. Kane, "Snoopy Collins" and Sir Dogg, quite the list of names here, lol. As an old school/nostalgic soul, the sampling of Parliament's "Flashlight" was always music to my ears, especially when it done right like it was here. I like this one.
*4 out of 5*




4. "From tha Chuuuch to da Palace"
Featuring Pharrell 
Produced by The Neptunes




Ok, before I talk about the actual song, I gotta go into a nostalgic moment, even though I've talked about this before on the blog. Back in 2002, I used to work at a local Pizza Hut in my hometown of Petersburg, VA. One particular evening, myself and a fellow co-worker named Robert were talking hip hop, mostly West Coast (Snoop was his favorite MC), and out of nowhere, I asked, "what would you think of Snoop on a Neptunes track?" He chuckled a bit before saying, "I don't know about that" (lol), and after this, that's when this song hit the airwaves and I was like, "wow, Snoop actually hooked up with the Neptunes." Man I do feel like I accurately predicted this happening, and to this day, Snoop and the Neptunes collaborate together. As for this song itself, I feel it would be safe to call it "What's My Name Pt. 3" based on the hook alone. It's pretty good and Snoop all but proved his laid back, West Coast styled vibes would mesh quite nicely over Neptunes production.
*4 out of 5*




5. "I Believe In You"
Featuring Latoiya Williams
Produced by Hi-Tek

This has to be a tribute to Snoop's wife Shante, and it's pretty good. Ms. Williams does her thing throughout as well.
*4 out of 5*




6. "Lollipop"
Featuring Jay-Z, Soopafly and Nate Dogg, Additional Vocals by Chrissy Luv
Produced by Just Blaze

Two things I'll say about this one is Just Blaze comes with an ill sample of Don Julian's "Where I'm Coming From" and it's much better than Lil Wayne's song of the same name that came out in 2008. Other than that, I mean, this one is more for the ladies and less for the fellas if you ask me. It's not excellent, it's not terrible, it's decent for what it is.
*3 out of 5*


7. "Ballin"
Featuring The Dramatics
Produced by Battlecat

Lil' Half Dead was incorrectly listed as being featured on this song because he was nowhere to be found, and with all due respect, his presence was not needed on this one. The Dramatics link back up with Snoop some 9 years after "Doggy Dogg World" and they bring a smooth interpolation to one of their own hits, "Fell For You", and what results is such a laid back, appropriately titled song.
*4.5 out of 5*




8. "Beautiful"
Featuring Pharrell and Uncle Charlie Wilson
Produced by The Neptunes




Thinking back to '02, this was a mainstay on the radio and it's still largely good, definitely an appreciation for the ladies. This may be the only Snoop Dogg song that your mother and grandmother could BOTH like with no problems. Now when I think about it, this was the song that solidified Snoop's relationship with the Neptunes going forward.
*4 out of 5*




9. "Paper'd Up"
Featuring Mr. Kane and Traci Nelson

Produced by "Fredwreck" Nassar

I guess Kokane wasn't "user friendly", so he changed it to Mr. Kane instead (not bad), and he comes with a brief, West Coast styled interpolation of Dennis Edwards' classic "Don't Look Any Further." And speaking of classic, Snoop comes with a nice remake of Eric B. & Rakim's "Paid In Full" (West Coast style of course), MUCH better than Lil Wayne's version might I add.
*4 out of 5*




10. "Wasn't Your Fault"
Background Vocals by Reo Vanardo
Produced by LT Hutton

Well, lol, when it comes to some, if not all, of the things women may do, as men we can't blame ourselves for that. At least that's what Snoop and Reo would have you believe as they make their cases, lol.
*3 out of 5*


11. "Bo$$ Playa"
Background Vocals by Shy Felder and Traci Nelson
Produced by "Fredwreck" Nassar

You can't deny the "bo$$ playa" status Snoop presents on this "Riding High" sampled song (courtesy of Faze-O).
*4 out of 5*




12. "Hourglass"
Featuring Mr. Kane and Goldie Loc
Produced by Jelly Roll

I'm sure the ladies would like this one more than the fellas would, that's for sure. It may or may not work in the clubs (on the West Coast), but outside of that, this was ok, nothing more. Mr. Kane had me chuckling a bit on this one, lol.
*2 out of 5*


13. "The One And Only"
Produced by DJ Premier

This is a historic moment right here, because as far as I'm concered, Snoop was the first West Coast MC to catch wreck on a Premier production and not surprisingly, it works and it's dope as hell. If you can't work a Premier track, you're probably in the wrong business.
*5 out of 5*




14. "I Miss That Bitch"
Featuring E-White, Background Vocals by Mr. Kane
Produced by Hi-Tek

The title of this song explicitly says it all don't it, lol? I can't say I personally can testify to what Snoop and E-White are talking about here, but I understand it in terms of missing a lady from the past.
*2 out of 5*


15. "From Long Beach 2 Brick City"
Featuring Redman and Nate Dogg
Produced by "Fredwreck" Nassar

Red hooks up with 2/3 of 213 for this one, featuring a nice sample courtesy of The Evasions' "Wikka Wrap." (Warren G was, uh, incorrectly listed as a featured guest here.) Long Beach and Brick City gets the job done.
*4 out of 5*




16. "Suited N Booted"
Background Vocals by Mallia (Queen of Funk)
Produced by Meech Wells and Keith Clark

Apply titled in a completely obvious nature is this song, lol, along with it being some "pimp shit."
*3 out of 5*


17. "You Got What I Want"
Featuring Ludacris, Goldie Loc and Uncle Charlie Wilson
Produced by Jelly Roll

This one was slightly better than "Lollipop" and it follows the same formula from that song as well.
*3.5 out of 5*


18. "Batman & Robin"
Featuring Lady of Rage and RBX
Produced by DJ Premier

Creative is the first word that comes to mind when it comes to this song. Snoop is playing the lyrical role of Batman, Rage is Robin and RBX flexes his role as "Commissioner X" The West Coast flavor that all involved brings to this, especially Premier's production, is nothing short of tight. I mean, the "Batman" themes are utilized/sampled so effectively here.
*5 out of 5*




19. "A Message 2 Fat Cuzz"


20. "Pimp Slapp'd"
Produced by Josef Leimberg

Wow, I almost forgot how good this diss song was and it goes to show that Snoop could still go in when he had to. This song was a hell of a shot directed at what was left of Death Row Records, but specifically Suge Knight, and I'm sure Snoop wasn't happy with the fact that he leaked "Tha Last Meal", which probably necessitated "Pimp Slapp'd." Snoop pulled no lyrical punches either, calling Suge jealous (among other things and even called him out by his name, something that most artists wouldn't have dared to do), claiming he still wasn't paid for "Deep Cover", plus Kurupt briefly felt Snoop's wrath here (apparently Kurupt left the Tha Dogg Pound to become VP of Death Row in such a short lived stint). Although all parties have reconciled in recent years, this is probably one of the more underrated you'll ever hear and it closes this album in true bo$$ fashion.
*5 out of 5*




This ended up being a little bit better than I remembered, and I'm taking it up from my previous 4 star rating to a solid 4.5. You can say Snoop took what worked on "Tha Last Meal" and applied to here, but either way, he was still inspired and it showed in the music. I also wonder why Dre didn't provide any production on this album, and not to say that the lack of presence from Dre hurt this album because it didn't. Top notch names like DJ Premier, The Neptunes, Hi-Tek, Just Blaze and more underrated names such as Jelly Roll, Battlecat, Soopafly and Meech Wells really did their part behind the boards, and you can tell Snoop was energized with the beats. Furthermore, it debuted at #12 on the "Billboard 200", down quite a bit from previous albums, almost in the top 10. It moved 174,000 units in its first week (also down from previous first week sales), later achieving a Platinum certification with 1,210,000 units sold as of November 2004. Very good album overall. 


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
3. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
4. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
5. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
6. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)






Release date: November 16, 2004


1. "I Love to Give You Light [Intro]"
Vocals by Tanya Devine
Produced by The Alchemist

Before I begin to talk about this intro, if you weren't aware, this was not the first time that Snoop had worked with Alchemist. In fact, the first time was for a joint called "Connected" from the Eastsidaz's 2001 album, "Duces 'n  Trayz: The Old Fashioned Way", which also featured Mobb Deep and Kokane. Check it out here:



Pretty good song right there. As for this intro, I could've done without the over-holiness displayed, but as a way to start the album, it was fine for what it was, especially Alchemist's sample of Andrae Crouch's "I Come That You Might Have Life." Again, I normally don't rate intros, but I'll make a *3 out of 5* exception for this one.


2. "Bang Out"
Vocals by Jasmin Lopez
Produced by J.R. 

Snoop is back bangin indeed on this appropriately titled, J.R. produced joint, almost like a second intro.
*3.5 out of 5*


3. "Drop It Like It's Hot"
Featuring Pharrell
Produced by The Neptunes




Even though this had came out right around the time when 2004 was wrapping up, it still was a hit and still bangs. Plus, my mom likes this song, which is an indication that it's GOOD. Snoop and Pharrell, the latter of whom drops what I consider to be his best verse ever, indeed "drop it like it's hot" on this one. History has shown this one to be a classic and I agree. (There was a remix, which will be posted, that came later which featured Jay-Z and his famous shot/diss towards R. Kelly. I feel the original is better. And courtesy of genius.com, a clip of Snoop and Pharrell talking about the making of this song will be included.)
*5 out of 5*









4. "Can I Get A Flicc Witchu"
Featuring Bootsy Collins
Produced by Josef Leimberg

I may be overrating this one a bit, but I really like it (it's something about the beat). And I'm sure that Snoop to this day would not be surprised at the number of people who would want to take pictures with him for a variety of reasons.
*4 out of 5*




5. "Ups & Downs"
Featuring The Bee Gees
Produced by Warryn "Baby Dubb" Campbell

I feel Snoop could've used this one to be a little more deep in terms of talking about his own ups and downs throughout his career. Somewhat of a missed opportunity here.
*3 out of 5*


6. "The Bidness"
Produced by Soopafly

"Don't fuck wit Snoop too much cause he goes off when/Niggas mouth too much so please no flossin"

"I had to tell you the truth homie but you got mad/Yeah, I hurt yo feelings, fuck it, it's too damn bad!"

I really like this one right here. Soopafly's beat is simply dope, and even though Snoop is hilarious off and on during this song, he's still serious with it and drops some dope lines in the process. "The bidness" indeed.
*4.5 out of 5*




7. "Snoop D-O- Double G"
Produced by Black Jeruz and Sha Money XL

Loyal reader, look at this title. Can we say "What's My Name Pt. 4", lol? Anytime when Snoop's name is in the title in any form, you know what to expect. Decent song.
*3 out of 5*


8. "Let's Get Blown"
Vocals by Pharrell and Keyshia Cole
Produced by The Neptunes



I remember not liking this song all that much when I first heard it, but after constant spins on the radio and allowing it to "sink in", it eventually grew on me a lot. And in a nice touch, I liked Snoop's interpolation of Slave's classic "Watching You", a personal favorite of mine. This may seem like it's for the ladies, but the fellas would enjoy it too. Great stuff here.
*4 out of 5*




9. "Step Yo Game Up"
Featuring Lil' Jon and Trina
Produced by Jonathan "Lil' Jon" Smith

A word on Lil' Jon, if I may, in the midst of Snoop's project. I'm surprised I haven't talked much about him on the blog, but then again I haven't covered that much material with him behind the boards. I certainly remember a time when the "crunk movement" was in full swing (on radio and TV), and my issue with Jon was not his production (he was hit and miss at times), it was due to him being on the mic in any form. It's easy to say, but clearly this guy is/was not an MC/rapper in any form and much like DJ Paul & Juicy J from Three 6 Mafia, he would've been much more effective by remaining behind the boards and spending LESS time on the mic and in videos, just saying. Oh yeah, and when he does get on the mic, my God does he try too hard for my tastes. I get that you want to get the place crunk/party started or whatever, but man tone that shit down just a little, lol. Case in point, his presence on this song was not needed, as a simple Snoop/Trina collabo (with the same beat) would've been just fine.
*3 out of 5*


10. "Perfect"
Featuring Charlie Wilson, Vocals by Pharrell
Produced by The Neptunes

I've always considering this one the unofficial sequel to "Beautiful", with the same musical elements from that song being present here. This one makes the same points in terms of full appreciation for the ladies, but it's a step below "Beautiful." It's still a good song though.
*3 out of 5*


11. "W BALLZ (Interlude)"


12. "Fresh Pair of Panties On"
Vocals by J. Black
Produced by Ole Folks

The title alone would (correctly) suggest this is MORE for the ladies and LESS for the fellas. Respectively, I can't imagine this one winning the fellas over.
*2 out of 5*


13. "Promise I"
Vocals by Treasure and Gazelle
Produced by Mr. Porter

The joints for the ladies continue with this one. There are no promises involved however, lol.
*3 out of 5*


14. "Oh No"
Featuring 50 Cent
Produced by Ron Browz

Probably the first time we get into some "gangsta shit" on this album, lol, but it's all good though. Snoop and a still hot 50 Cent link up for this banger.
*4 out of 5*




15. "Can U Control Yo Hoe"
Featuring Soopafly
Produced by L.T. Hutton

And just like that, we go from the gangsta shit to the "pimp shit", lol. And with that said, I wasn't too impressed with this one. Let's continue on.
*2 out of 5*


16. "Signs"
Featuring Charlie Wilson and Justin Timberlake
Produced by The Neptunes




All the factors involved would suggest this is ANOTHER joint on the album for the ladies. It does have a fast paced, good feeling type vibe, so in that regard it's not a bad song.
*3 out of 5*


17. "I'm Threw Witchu"
Featuring Soopafly, Vocals by Daz
Produced by Warryn "Baby Dubb" Campbell

I know you shouldn't judge a song by its title, but hot damn, we get it already. Sorry for the vague comments, but I really could've done without this particular song, plus it seemed like it was Soopafly's song more than it was Snoop's. Worst song on the album.
*1.5 out of 5*


18. "Pass It Pass It"
Vocals by Pharrell and Keyshia Cole
Produced by The Neptunes

This was decent, but compared to previous Snoop/Neptunes collabos already, "From tha Chuuch to da Palace" for example, it slightly misses the mark.
*3 out of 5*


19. "Girl Like You"
Featuring Nelly
Produced by L.T. Hutton (w/ vocals also)

You would think I would be a little tired of "songs for the ladies" at this point in the album, but man this one is catchy in its own way. I'm not a Nelly fan, but his presence did not take away from this song.
*4 out of 5*




20. "No Thang On Me"
Featuring Bootsy Collins, Vocals by Quaze, Josef Leimberg and Raji
Produced by Hi-Tek and The Snoopadelics

The last thing this album needed was an anti-climatic closer and that's what we get here. Snoop can sing at times, depending on the song, but this was not one of those moments, plus it was about 2 minutes too long.
*2 out of 5* (mostly due to the beat)


This is a very good, 3.5 star album, and I wanted to go with at least 4 stars, but there's filler here that's ultimately brings it down, and had certain songs not made it, the results would be much different. Lyrically it was about the same as his previous album and the production was solid (again, no Dr. Dre present). In addition to Snoop himself, it was the successful "Drop It Like It's Hot" single that sold this album, and speaking of that success, it stayed on the "Billboard Hot 100" chart for 3 weeks, and check this out, it was his first song to hit #1, which is amazing when you think back to how big (and successful) "Doggystyle" was. In 2005, it was nominated for two Grammy awards, "Best Rap Song" (lost to Kanye's "Jesus Walks") and "Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group" (lost to Black Eyed Peas' "Let's Get It Started"). "Let's Get Blown" was also a success, but slightly compared to "Drop It Like It's Hot" (The Neptunes were nominated for a Grammy award based on this song's production, "Producer of the Year, Non-Classical"). It also debuted at #6 on the "Billboard 200", with 225,000 units moved in its first week (up a bit from the first week sales of "Paid da Cost to be Da Bo$$"), further hitting the Platinum mark with 1,724,000 copies sold as of March 2008. Next up is 2006's "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment."




1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
3. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
4. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
5. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
6. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
7. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)



This portion of the project will be taken verbatim from my post on December 12, 2014, with new thoughts in bold. 




Release date: November 21, 2006



1. "Intrology"
Featuring George Clinton
Produced By Battlecat

This "cool" intro starts the album on a very good note, leading us into.....

2. "Think About It"
Produced By Frequency

"Basically you hear these rappers out here using my flow/They need Snoop on they song to make they shit official though"


In an interesting fact about this dope song, producer Frequency made this beat in his dorm room, while attending school in Virginia, a year and a half before this album dropped. It was then passed to Snoop on behalf of Mike Chavez from Geffen Records, next thing you know this is what we got. Snoop rides this beat oh so well throughout, definitely a "second" good start to this album.
*5 out of 5*





3. "Crazy"
Featuring Nate Dogg
Produced By "Frewreck" Farid Nassar

Oh man, I REALLY like this one right here, even if the "C" in California may stand for crazy in reference to this song, lol. Snoop talks about the good ol' Cali life, along with an entertaining hook provided by the late Nate Dogg. Frewreck was a fool for this beat, I agree!
*5 out of 5*






4. "Vato"
Featuring B-Real
Produced By The Neptunes



Interesting story. In 2002, myself and a former co-worker by the name of Robert were talking about Snoop, his favorite rapper. During the conversation, we began to talk about producers that Snoop hadn't worked with before and how his style would fit them. To this day, I remember mentioning the Neptunes (not randomly), and he all but shot that down, lol. From there, to our surprise (mostly his), for the first time, Snoop hooked up with Pharrell and Chad Hugo for his "Paid Da Cost To Be Da Boss" album, notably on cuts such as "Beautiful" and "From tha Chuuuch to da Palace". (Yep, and this story was told again during that album, lol.) This is another dope song which finds Snoop linking up with Cypress Hill's B-Real in a true display of Black and Latino unity in the hip hop community.
*4 out of 5*





5. "That's That Shit"
Featuring R. Kelly
Produced By Nottz



I'm not an R. Kelly fan, but hot damn I can't/couldn't deny how nice and smooth this one is, justified by the spins it received on the radio back in '06. Good stuff here.
*4 out of 5*



6. "Candy (Drippin' Like Water)
Featuring E-40, MC Eiht, Goldie Loc, and Tha Dogg Pound
Produced By Rick Rock


I may be overrating this, but I REALLY like the West Coast vibe present on this one, and they're not talking about your "traditional candy" either, lol .Candy to these artists come in the form of narcotics, a "certain male private part", cars, money, and sex. E-40, another artist I'm not a fan but have great respect for, delivered a good verse along with everyone else involved. 
*5 out of 5*






7. "Get A Light"
Featuring Damian "Jr Gong" Marley
Produced By Timbaland

This Damian Marley assisted simply bangs, no doubt. Much props to Timbaland for bringing his signature sound but with a true West Coast twist.
*5 out of 5*





8. "Gangbanga 101"
Featuring The Game
Produced By Terrace Martin

The Bloods (Game) and the Crips (Snoop) connect for this appropriately titled bangerSnoop is hard as ever, and so is Game, who was still motivated at this point (as well as "The Doctor's Advocate" dropping one week prior to this album). More dope stuff here.
*5 out of 5*





9. "Boss' Life"
Featuring Akon
Produced By Dr. Dre

When I first heard this song, I immediately thought of Busta Rhymes' "Everybody Rise", as both songs sample The Controllers' "If Tomorrow Never Comes". Also, apparently there was a different version of this song that featured Nate Dogg, however, my version has Akon, whose vocals were pulled from later versions due to label issues. Either way, Snoop is in his true element here, coming off as the respected West Coast boss that he is.
*5 out of 5*



10. "LAX"
Featuring Ice Cube
Produced By Battlecat

Of course the first thing that hit me was the audio clips/samples from Biggie's "Goin Back To Cali". Good song here showing more Cali love, this time to L.A.
*4 out of 5*


11. "10 Lil' Crips"
Produced By The Neptunes

"So, don't give them niggas a reason
To turn it into spray season
Don't give them niggas a reason
Because they'll turn it into Crip season!"


Well, that about sums up this Neptunes produced banger, showing a slick, aggressive side in Snoop. Speaking of the Neptunes, props to them as well (like Timbaland) for creating a true West Coast sound for Snoop to flex on. Tight!
*5 out of 5*





12. "Round Here"
Produced By Dr. Dre

Good song right here. Snoop covers a familiar topic: how things are where he comes from and how you don't want any problems there either. The more things change, the more things stay the same I guess, lol.
*4 out of 5


13.  "A Bitch I Knew"
Produced By Rhythm D

You know, the title of this should've been "Bitches I Knew", lol, just saying. Treva, Vanessa, Tanisha, Patricia, Tammy, Brandi, Clarissa Bell, and Yvette have all had a piece, if you will, of Snoop at some point based on these experiences, lol.
*3 out of 5*


14. "Like This"
Featuring Western Union (Damani, Soopafly, and Bad Lucc), Latoiya Williams and Raul Midon
Produced By Soopafly

In addition to what the artists are asking you to do here, you can simply two step and throw you hands in the air to the melody of this song.
*3 out of 5*


15. "Which One Of You"
Featuring Nine Inch Dix
Produced By 1500

I think this is the portion of the album strictly for the ladies, as evident with this and the next two songs.
*3 out of 5*


16. "I Wanna Fuck You"
Featuring Akon
Produced By Aliaune "Akon" Thiam

I remember this song receiving seemingly tons of radio play back in '06. It's not great, it's not bad, it's simply ok. I was never a big fan of this song. (Akon's beat is good.)
*3 out of 5*


17. "Psst!"
Featuring Jamie Foxx
Produced By Jamie Foxx, N8 and Brainz

Oh, this joint was tailor made for the strip clubs, no doubt about that.
*3 out of 5*


18. "Beat Up On Yo Pads"
Produced By Mr. Porter and DJ DDT

This was a pretty good, fast paced anthem for the Snoop Youth Football League (he is a certified football coach), which is also why there was little to no cursing on this one. Definitely for the kids.
*4 out of 5*


19. "Don't Stop"
Featuring War Zone (Goldie Loc, MC Eiht and Kam) and Kurupt
Produced By Chris "THX" Goodman

Snoop doesn't drop a verse on this apply titled song, so it comes off as more of a showcase for WarZone. Still good though.
*4 out of 5*


20. "Imagine"
Featuring Dr. Dre and D'Angelo
Produced By Dr. Dre and Mark Batson

As a reflective person, I can totally relate to a song like this, because at various points I'm always imagining how life would be if certain things did or didn't happen (Dre and Snoop allude to most of those things in this song too). Lyrically it's very good and don't get me started on the TIGHT beat, featuring that unmistakable Dre sound, complete with fine instrumentation (they sick with the piano) and dope claps.
*5 out of 5*




21. "Conversations"
Featuring Stevie Wonder
Produced By DJ Pooh

"When you feel life's too hard, just go have a talk with God." That's the present theme here and Snoop closes this album on quite the religious note.
*4 out of 5*





Before I get to my overall thoughts about this album, let's compare this to his work post 2006. The albums after "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment", specifically "Ego Trippin", "Malice N Wonderland", and especially "Doggumentary" are NOWHERE near this album in terms of quality (or sheer dopeness). (These thoughts remain the same, but the remainder of this project my true, overall feelings on those three albums going forward, and of course they will likely not be a match for TBCT.)  As for the albums before TBCT, well, it goes without saying that it's not better than "Doggystyle", it beats "Tha Doggfather" and "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told", I like it more than "Tha Last Meal", "Paid Da Cost To Be Da Boss", and "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): The Masterpiece". (Talk about stating the obvious, lol.) Now, as far as "No Limit Top Dogg" goes, this is a situation where I would have to listen to both albums back to back, because both are that good, and that brings us back to TBCT.  (This project has shown that listening to both of those albums back to back is not needed, as TBCT is better than NLTD in my opinion.)

Although things slow down a bit between songs 13-17, the remainder of this album is incredible, featuring an inspired Snoop flowing over some DOPE production, and I do mean dope. (It debuted at #5 on the "Billboard 200", with 264,000 units moved in its first week and 1,139,000 total sold as of June 2015 for another Platinum certification.) Quite frankly, this is the last true great Snoop Dogg album and it's one I would strongly recommend, definitely for first time listeners and those who haven't bumped it in a long time. (The last true great Snoop Dogg album? We shall see.) 4.5 stars.


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)






Release date: March 7, 2008 


[In the leadup, I remember hearing Snoop say that he was going to have some ghostwriters on this album. At the time, I was not happy about that revelation and it sunk my interest in copping the album..... until I did just that in early 2010, lol. I haven't bumped it since that time so it's going to be real interesting to see how/where my thoughts are this time around.]


1. "A Word Witchya! (Intro)"
This Scoop Deville produced intro leads us into.....


2. "Press Play"
Produced by DJ Quik

Listening to this, Snoop gives the impression that he was away from the game for a long time and this was his return, or at least that's the impression I got, lol. Decent.
*3 out of 5*


3. "SD Is Out"
Featuring Charlie Wilson
Produced by Teddy Riley

I kinda want to take the easy route and say this was "What's My Name Pt. 5", lol. I also can't believe it took this long for Snoop and Mr. Teddy Riley to link up, but what we get here is pretty nice and smooth (nice enough for the fellas, smooth enough for the ladies).
*4 out of 5*




4. "Gangsta Like Me"
Produced by Teddy Riley

Talk about the complete opposite of the previous song. This is merely ok, but even from Snoop we have heard this before and done better, plus it was about 1 1/2 minutes too long.
*2 out of 5*


5. "Neva Have 2 Worry"
Featuring Uncle Chucc
Produced by Snoop and Terrace Martin

For the first time in quite a while, Snoop gets introspective for us, not only talking about his status in hip hop, circa 2008, he also wondered where the West would've been had he lost the case (referring to the aforementioned trial in '96 where he was cleared of murder charges), plus he addresses his tenure at No Limit, and for the life of me I still have to wonder is he throwing a subtle or not so subtle at P (or whoever) when he once again says "that's the last time a nigga gon eat off me" when talking about the "Last Meal" album. Very good song.
*4 out of 5*




6. "Sexual Eruption"
Produced by Shawty Redd




I know a few people who weren't too crazy about this song, but personally I love it. Snoop is likely the only artist with the extreme style and grace to do a song like this and make it work without his hip hop credibility being questioned, and I also heard that producer Shawty Redd wrote this for him. (and yes, I made an exception for the dreaded Auto-Tune on this one, lol). The video also is full of style and grace, serving as a true throwback to the 70s AND a nice tribute to the late Roger Troutman. Whether you call this "Sexual Eruption" or "Sensual Seduction", this is great stuff.
*5 out of 5*




7. "Life Of Da Party"
Featuring Too $hort and Mistah F.A.B.
Produced by Scoop Deville




The date, time and location slips my mind, but I was at some gathering and I believe the DJ threw this joint on. Needless to say, it had the dancefloor rocking, no question. Scoop Deville brings some production tailor made for a party and Snoop, Short Dog and Mistah F.A.B. do their thing with the vocals.
*4 out of 5*




8. "Waste of Time"
Featuring Raphael Saadiq
Produced by Raphael Saadiq and Bobby Ozuna

Apparently this song Snoop details the trials and tribulations, moreso about his wife individually than them as a married team. They remain together as of this posting.
*3 out of 5*


9. "Cool"
Produced by Teddy Riley

I commend Snoop for trying to remake The Time's song of the same name, but I honestly could've done without this filler. The one positive thing I can say about this song is that it didn't exceed the 4:02.
*2 out of 5*


10. "Sets Up"
Featuring Pharrell
Produced by The Neptunes

You cannot mistake this one for anything other than your typical/standard "West Coast G shit" with a Neptunes touch. Decent song.
*3 out of 5*


11. "Deez Hollywood Nights"
Produced by Nottz

A day/evening in the life of Snoop in Hollywood, nothing more or less. I could've done without this one as well.
*2 out of 5*


12. "Whateva U Do"
Produced by Khao

I don't think I've used the word uninspired at any point during this project, but unfortunately that's the first word that came to mind here. Everything about this song suggests something we have heard before and done better.
*1.5 out of 5*


13. "Staxxx In My Jeans"
Produced by Rick Rock

I've made it no secret that I've never been a fan of anything "chopped & screwed", and sadly we get that for this song's hook. With all due respect, this sounded like something that would fit Ludacris more than Snoop. He tries here, but ultimately, I didn't care too much about this one.
*2 out of 5*


14. "Been Around Tha World"
Featuring LaTonya Givens
Produced by Snoop and Terrace Martin

Ok, I initially thought this song was going to be another one for Snoop's wife, but as I listened more closely, Snoop's "boo" in this one is clearly hip hop...... but towards the end, it does seem like it's dedicated to his wife (I'm confused, lol). It's decent, but he could've done so much more with this.
*2.5 out of 5*


15. "Let It Out"
Produced by Teddy Riley and Ron Fair

Um, I don't even think the smokers would care too much for this one. At least it was under 3 minutes.
*2 out of 5*


16. "My Medicine"
Featuring Willie Nelson
Produced by Whitey Ford




I'll give credit to Snoop for trying something that was COMPLETELY out of his comfort zone, but man, I don't ever want to hear any attempts from anyone to try to merge hip hop with country, it simply doesn't/won't work or sound remotely good. Hip hop has worked well with other genres in the past, country is not one of them.
*1 out of 5*


17. "Ridin' In My Chevy"
Produced by Scoop Deville

The entire vibe of this one is truly Southern, from the lyrics to the production. Again, it's decent, nothing more.
*3 out of 5*


18. "Those Gurlz"
Produced by Teddy Riley and DJ Quik

Teddy and Quik bless Snoop with a nice beat for him to talk about one of his favorite topics: the "gurlz."
*3.5 out of 5* (a large part of this rating is due to the production)


19. "One Chance (Make It Good)"
Produced by Frequency

Snoop's word to the fellas: if you have a good woman, you better do your part and hold on to her. I get what Snoop was going for, but being sequenced after "Those Gurlz", the impact, if you will, was lessened just a bit.
*3 out of 5*


20. "Why Did You Leave Me"
Produced by Hit-Boy and Polow Da Don

At this point in the album, it comes off like Snoop is not quite sure how he feels about his wife, especially when you consider "Waste of Time."
*2 out of 5*


21. "Can't Say Goodbye"
Featuring Charlie Wilson
Produced by Teddy Riley

When you're accustomed to certain habits/lifestyles, it can be quite the challenge to let go, so to speak. At the end of the day, you have to do what you best and keep pressing on (for change). A very good way to close this album.
*3.5 out of 5*



Ok, is it just me or is "Sexual Eruption" the best song on this album? I mean, that's a great song as I mentioned, however, if a song like that is the best on your album, what does that say about the rest of the material? In a nutshell, the aforementioned "Sexual Eruption", "Life Of Da Party", "Neva Have 2 Worry" and "SD Is Out" literally save this album from being a total waste of time. Whether Snoop had ghostwriters or not, you can listen to this and tell he was either bored, distracted, simply ran out of things to rap about or a combination of all three. An album like this would suggest a true hiatus, but Snoop wouldn't stop here because his 10th album, "Malice N Wonderland" would drop the next year. "Ego Trippin" would move 137,000 units in its first week, which represents a true drop in first week sales (and this wouldn't be entirely Snoop's fault, because physical albums sales would drop across the board as iTunes and the like would become more prominent), debuting at #5 on the "Billboard 200." Although it was the 10th best selling hip hop album in '08, it only moved 401,000 units, which represents another drop and would be the least purchased album of his career at this point and definitely his worst in terms of quality. I was heading for a 2 star rating (probably the first album to get that rating from me in a long time), but the four songs listed above warrants a 2.5 rating, a generous one to be sure. 


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)
9. "Ego Trippin" (2.5 stars)






Release date: December 8, 2009


1. "Intro"


2. "I Wanna Rock"
Produced by Scoop Deville




Oh man, I think most people may have forgotten about how DOPE this joint was when it dropped. Backed by a TIGHT Scoop Deville production and WELL TIMED samples courtesy of Rob Base & DJ EZ-Rock's classic "It Takes Two", Snoop is completely in charge here and lyrically at home, kind of an underrated gem and a great start. Best song on the album to be sure.
*5 out of 5*




3. "2 Minute Warning"
Produced by Terrace Martin

Clocking in at 1:54, Snoop comes with some decent lines (and no hook).
*3 out of 5*


4. "1800"
Featuring and produced by Lil' Jon

Quite a good, fast paced song right here (aimed at the ladies and the clubs). Granted he's not all over this one, but it would've been that much better without the presence of Lil' Jon, exactly what I alluded to earlier when I talked about him.
*3.5 out of 5*




5. "Different Languages"
Featuring Jazmine Sullivan
Produced by Teddy Riley and Scoop Deville, Co-Produced by PMG

When there's something about a man (or woman) that's so good, no matter what that may be, it can apparently can make you speak different languages..... in reverse too, lol. Good song and Ms. Sullivan, making noise in '09, did equally good on the hook.
*3 out of 5*


6. "Gangsta Luv"
Featuring The-Dream
Produced by C. "Tricky" Stewart and Terius "The-Dream" Nash




Just to show you what direction hip hop was in at the time, this joint, while decent, was played on the radio more than "I Wanna Rock" and it's clear which song is superior, however, considering this was for the ladies and it featured another R&B artist who made noise in '09, The-Dream, the amount of exposure on the radio was not surprising to me, then and now. (Oh, and the cover of the single did NOT need the "Scarface" influence.)
*3 out of 5*


7. "Pronto"
Featuring Soulja Boy Tell 'Em
Produced by B Don, Co-Produced by Super Ced

To this day, I'll NEVER understand the, uh, appeal of Soulja Boy and how he managed to have the success he had, which again shows you what direction hip hop was in at this point. Not sure why Snoop felt the need to have him anywhere on this album, but his presence added nothing to this song PLUS the auto-tuned hook didn't help matters either. Let's move on.
*1.5 out of 5*


8. "That's Tha Homie"
Produced by Danja

Wow, loyal reader, "What's My Name Pt. 6" right here, lol. Revisiting this one, the production is definitely something that was somewhat commonplace in '09 and overall this song knocks with Snoop feeling it all the way through.
*4 out of 5*





9. "Upside Down"
Featuring Nipsey Hussle and Problem
Produced by Terrace Martin, Co-Produced by Jason Martin

I had to look at the album insert a couple of times to make sure it was Terrace (and Jason) who made this beat, because it does come with a Swizz Beatz esque sound, which is not meant as a knock. This is another very good song, tailor made for the dancefloor, two stepping with a drink in hand, yes indeed. Problem comes with the hook, Snoop brings two good verses and if Nipsey Hussle went a little longer with his verse, he may have stole the show.
*4 out of 5*





10. "Secrets"
Featuring Kokane
Produced by Battlecat

Yep, Mr. Kokane is back, lol. This was decent, nothing more to say about it. It would suggest something deep, but with all due respect it's not close.
*3 out of 5*


11. "Pimpin Ain't EZ"
Featuring R. Kelly
Produced by Nottz

Well, the title should tell you all you need to know about this one, and after "That's That Shit", is it just me or did Snoop and R. Kelly have this good chemistry with each other? Surprisingly, Kelly did not bring this one down. It's not as smooth as "That's That Shit", but considering the topic, it makes its points, also featuring a nice sample courtesy of The Commodores' "Zoom."
*4 out of 5*




12. "Luv Drunk"
Featuring The-Dream
Produced by C. "Tricky" Stewart and Terius "The-Dream" Nash

"So Wayne, is this joint for the ladies too?" Um, yes, how'd you guess, lol? Well, let's just say "Gangsta Luv" is better than this one and move on.
*2 out of 5*


13. "Special"
Featuring Brandy and Pharrell
Produced by The Neptunes

Wow. You know what, I'm not even surprised this album closes with ANOTHER one solely for the ladies. I mean, this was ok, but it's such an anti-climatic way to close the album, even with the "Outro" coming up.


14. "Outro"
This outro was strange in that it seemed like it was something that, I don't know, should've started the previous song instead. That's just me though.



Well, this album literally is up and down. "I Wanna Rock" is the major highlight here, with "Pimpin Ain't EZ", "Upside Down", "That's Tha Homie" and even "1800" right behind it. Everything else, while not outright wack, pales in comparison and you can classify it as filler. The album also debuted at #23 on the "Billboard 200", tremendously down from even the "Ego Trippin" album, moving 61,000 units in first week sales (again, down from the previous album), unfortunately a low charting album for Snoop. Thus far it has moved 400,000 units as of 2011, which is not bad, but 100,000 below Certified Gold status. I'm actually a bit torn on my rating for the album (which may turn out to be generous), but other than that, I honestly have nothing more to say about it.

(Snoop did release "More Malice" on March 23, 2010, which I did cop on its release date, along with Freeway & Jake One's "The Stimulus Package." It came with five new songs, some remixes, most notably the Jay-Z assisted "I Wanna Rock (Remix)", which is dope as hell, and a brief "movie" which almost followed the same steps, if you will, as "Murder Was The Case" in 1994.)



1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Malice n Wonderland" (3.5 stars)
9. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)
10. "Ego Trippin" (2.5 stars)






Release date: March 29, 2011

(Initially I did cop this on its release date, but I quickly sold it after the fact because I wasn't impressed with it. So, years later, lol, I went ahead and copped another brand new copy. Will my views in 2016 be different from those in 2011 or will they remain the same? We shall see.)



1. "Toyz N Da Hood"
Featuring Bootsy Collins
Produced by Jake One

This opening was all Bootsy Collins, speaking over a good Jake One production with a 2011 twist on Parliament's classic "Not Just Knee Deep."
*2.5 out of 5*


2. "The Way Life Used To Be"
Produced by DJ Battlecat

This sample driven song probably should've opened the album instead of what we got, because it's a very nostalgic song from Snoop and I could tell the spirit of his grandmother was present during the making of this.
*4 out of 5*




3. "My Own Way"
Featuring and produced by Mr. Porter

Snoop has essentially did things his way in hip hop since the days of "Deep Cover" and here we are full circle (circa 2011) with his longevity and "boss status." One more verse and this would've been a "4 out of 5" song.
*3.5 out of 5*




4. "Wonder What I Do"
Featuring Uncle Chucc
Produced by DJ Battlecat

Battlecat comes with a decent, West Coast styled, 2011 update of Taana Gardner's "Heart Beat." I found myself liking it more as the song continued to play on, but it seemed like it was stuck in first gear and never quite reached its potential.
*3 out of 5*


5. "My Fucn House"
Featuring Young Jeezy and E-40
Produced by Rick Rock

OG status, big ballin status, no matter what status you want to define this as, they all apply. These three men own and run "the house" and nothing will stand in their way. Oh yeah, was it me or did 40's closing verse end up as the standout here? Good song for what it is.
*3.5 out of 5*



6. "Peer Pressure"
Featuring Traci Nelson
Produced by "FredWreck" Farid Nassar

This one follows the same formula as "Crazy" from "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment", in terms of the production, while not as catchy.
*2 out of 5*


7. "I Don't Need No Bitch"
Featuring Devin The Dude and Kobe Honeycutt
Produced by DJ Khalil

Well, this title says it all don't it, lol? When it comes to straight "pimp shit" like this, you won't find Devin The Dude too far behind. Khalil's somewhat thumping, key laden production brings a vibe you wouldn't normally hear on a song like this.
*3 out of 5*


8. "Platinum"
Featuring R. Kelly
Produced by Lecus "Lex Luger" Lewis

One thing I can say about Lex Luger around this time is that he had a signature sound, even if most of his beats tend to sound the same. As far as this Snoop/Kelly collabo, not surprisingly, this one is a step down from "That's That Shit" and "Pimpin Ain't EZ", mainly because we've heard songs like this before and I don't need to hear two entire verses from the likes of R. Kelly on any hip hop song.
*2 out of 5*


9. "Boom"
Featuring T-Pain
Produced by Scott Storch




This second single from the album was clearly aimed at the radio and the ladies, nothing more or less, plus T-Pain had all but worn out his welcome with me at this point. Not great, not bad, probably smack dab in the middle (and I don't think I've ever heard more of a futuristic Scott Storch production).
*2 out of 5*


10. "We Rest In Cali"
Featuring Goldie Loc and Bootsy Collins
Produced by Mr. Porter

This Zapp sampled song, courtesy of "Heartbreaker", makes good use of said sample, but that's where it begins and ends for me.
*2.5 out of 5*


11. "El Lay"
Featuring Marty James
Produced by Scoop Deville

This ode/dedication to the city of Los Angeles was decent, but I can't help but feel that something was missing to make it more than decent.
*3 out of 5*


12. "Gangbang Rookie"
Featuring Pilot
Produced by Jake One

Welcome to "What's My Name Pt. 7", lol. I get the gangsta element Snoop was trying to bring, but considering how gangsta Snoop is/was able to make it in years past, this is more of a missed opportunity than anything else, plus Pilot's verse was forgettable.
*2.5 out of 5*


13. "This Weed Is Mine"
Featuring Wiz Khalifa, Additional Vocals by Latoiya Williams
Produced by Scoop Deville

When there's weed involved, you won't find one Wiz Khalifa too far behind. I'm not a fan of his and even objectively, his appearance on this did nothing for me. Will you believe that Wiz was making more noise than Snoop at this point, smh? Either way, of all the songs for the smokers, this one is at the bottom of the list.
*2 out of 5*


14. "Wet"
Produced by The Cataracs




 Apparently Snoop made this song for the bachelor party of Prince William..... but that doesn't make it a good song. Granted, this is not for me (clearly) and the fellas, but even as a song I didn't feel this back in '11 and I don't feel it in '16. "Sexual Eruption" had a certain style, grace and retro vibe that this one DOESN'T have, definitely the worst song of Snoop's career.
*1 out of 5*


15. "Take U Home"
Featuring Too $hort, Daz and Kokane
Produced by Meech Wells

The "pimp shit" continues here. What else can I say about it?
*1.5 out of 5*


16. "Sumthin Like This Night"
Featuring and produced by The Gorillaz

Seems like this one was for the smokers and nothing more. I could see this one getting mixed feedback from said smokers, especially when you considering that songs of this nature have been done before and better, even by Snoop himself.
*2 out of 5*


17. "Superman"
Featuring and produced by Willie Nelson

Ok, trying to, uh, branch out and do something different is one thing and if this was strictly for laughs, I get it, but otherwise, I have nothing more to say about this, can't even rate it.


18. "Eyez Closed"
Featuring Kanye West (producer) and John Legend

You know, for the first true pairing of Snoop and Kanye, this should've been a big deal, but this came a couple of years too late. Even though the song attempts to address life and some of the stresses/hardships that come with it, Snoop seemed to be going through the motions and Kanye sounds uninspired. You can argue that their delivery is trying to match the song's tone, but I still look at this as a missed opportunity. Oh, and did we really need another sample of Jimmy Spicer's "Money (Dollar Bill Y'all)?"
*2 out of 5*


19. "Raised In Da Hood"
Produced by Warry "Baby Dubb" Campbell, Co-Produced by DJ Reflex

I like the throwback vibe (West Coast style) brought by all parties on this apply titled song, quite decent. The more this one played, I feel an appearance by Daz and Kurupt would've made this one better.
*3 out of 5*


20. "It's D Only Thang"
Produced by David Banner, Co-Produced by THX

"Winning isn't everything, it's d only thang", that I understand. When you look at how long Snoop has been in the game at this point, his experience, as well as others with similar tenure, should show you a few things when it comes to winning, especially when you "go hard, blood, sweat, and tears." Another decent song.
*3 out of 5*


21. "Cold Game"
Featuring Latoiya Williams
Produced by Rick Rude

Snoop honestly doesn't have any cases to make when it comes to paying dues, because we all know he has paid them, no question about that. This closer, which is pretty good, does see Snoop coming with somewhat of a reflective state of mind and when looking at the big picture regarding this album, I'll have a little more to say coming up.
*3.5 out of 5*



"So Wayne, after revisiting Doggumentary, do you still feel the same way about the album today as you did in 2011?" Well, let's just say I like it SLIGHTLY better, but trust me that does NOT mean all that much overall. Even after "Toyz N Da Hood", it seemed like it was on the way to becoming something quite good, but after "My Own Way", the remainder of the album settled into your "standard Snoop Dogg fare" and never looked back. My first problem with this album is the title, and before I get to those thoughts, I recall seeing that he was apparently going to make this a sequel to "Doggystyle" and my God I'm glad he changed things, because in NO way is this any kind of a sequel to his finest album. So, the "Doggumentary" title itself is misleading, because in my view, it suggests a more introspective, reflective side of Snoop we hadn't seen in quite some time (and at this point in his career, that wouldn't have been too much to ask for), and outside of "My Own Way", "Cold Game" and "The Way Life Used To Be", we didn't get that on this album, which leads me to my second problem. Everything, and I do mean everything, on this album comes across as stuff we have heard before from Snoop and he clearly has done it better (the lyrics are about what you would expect and the production is more miss than hit, plus an album like this did not need 21 songs). I don't want to call the homie lazy, but going through the motions would be a more appropriate description here. The three songs I mentioned are good, but not enough to save this album. It's not a waste of money in the sense that it's part of my (Snoop) collection, but I see no reason to revisit this album again. 

It debuted at #8 on the "Billboard 200", moving 50,000 units in its first week and as of December 2013, it sits at a total of 385,000 units sold.


1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Malice n Wonderland" (3.5 stars)
9. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)
10. "Ego Trippin" (2.5 stars)
11. "Doggumentary" (2 stars)






Release date: April 23, 2013


[Now this one should be interesting. Not only will this be my first time checking this out, but this would be Snoop's first, and thus far only, release under his reggae persona, Snoop Lion.]


1. "Rebel Way"
Produced by Dre Skull and Major Lazer

One song in and I gotta say Snoop does a rather good job with the reggae sound, which I'll give him credit for that, and outside of a few flirtations with it in the Death Row days, the reggae sound is something new for him, especially circa 2013. He makes some very good points on this opener, saying to love our musicians while they're here, and yes within recent years, we have lost a good number of them, but it seems like the overwhelming love (and support) rises to the surface when they pass away and it shouldn't be like that. He also says "we gotta make our moments last and don't dwell on the past, cause time is moving fast." Very good way to start "Reincarnated."
*4 out of 5*




2. "Here Comes The King"
Featuring Angela Hunte
Produced by Major Lazer, Ariel Rechtshaid and 6Blocc




Snoop has claimed his superiority since day one, so a song like this, even in a reggae form, should be no surprise to anyone. This was also the first single from the album.
*3 out of 5*


3. "Lighters Up"
Featuring Mavado and Popcaan
Produced by Major Lazer and Dre Skull







I'm sure the smokers would still try to find some way to get lifted to this one, lol, but this song, the album's second single, is all about unity, which is something that's not really addressed in any genre of music anymore. Even in reggae form, Snoop finds an entertaining way of bringing us all together as one.
*4 out of 5*




4. "So Long"
Featuring Angela Hunte
Produced by Major Lazer and Zion I Kings

I like the message here: even through such long journeys (no matter what they may be), the strong love and bonds will ensure you make it to your intended destination. Good stuff here.
*4 out of 5*




5. "Get Away"
Featuring Angela Hunte
Produced by Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

This appropriately titled song is quite the up-tempo jam, plus Ms. Hunte is showing some continuously good chemistry with Snoop.
*3 out of 5*


6. "No Guns Allowed"
Featuring Cori B. and Drake
Produced by Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid




When you look at the gun violence in our country, especially over the last 5 years or so, it's a good thing when artists of any genre speak about that in the music. If we can't get Congress to change the gun laws, maybe a difference can be made in the music, but as usual the essential key is getting and maintaining support. These points are made here and even Drake, someone I'm not a fan of, does his part by addressing these issues along with Snoop and Cori B.
*4 out of 5*




"7. "Fruit Juice"
Featuring Mr. Vegas
Produced by Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

Lol, now Snoop Dogg would've taken a song like this to another level of the game when you consider parties, strip clubs, you name it, but he takes an interesting twist here with the drinks of choice (juices, no sodas, lol). It's all in an effort to have a good time and enjoy life as opposed to "other things", lol.
*3 out of 5*


8. "Smoke The Weed"
Featuring Collie Buddz
Produced by Supa Dups, Jus Bus and Major Lazer

Well it didn't take long to get a song like this on the album did it, lol? This is more for the smokers than "Lighters Up" was and it's good for what it is. Guest Collie Buddz brings a decent verse of his own (I first heard him on the very good "Come Around").
*3 out of 5*


9. "Tired Of Running"
Featuring Akon (producer), co-produced by Leslie Brathwaite

I'm sure Snoop and Akon have long left the troubled portions of their past lives behind them a long time ago, but at the same time, I get the theme here: when you're tired of running from law enforcement, change should be the order of the day.
*3 out of 5*


10. "The Good Good"
Featuring IZA
Produced by Terrace Martin and Kyle Townsend

Rather than incorporate the somewhat usual sexually charged lyrics with a reggae twist, Snoop goes in a different route, as the aforementioned sexually charged lyrics takes a backseat to pure love and that brings a fresh perspective to an otherwise cliched topic.
*3.5 out of 5*





11. "Torn Apart"
Featuring Rita Ora
Produced by John Hill, Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

This would be the opposite of "The Good Good", instead said "good good" is gone (lol) and now the trick, if you will, is how to recapture what's good.
*3 out of 5*


12. "Ashtrays and Heartbreaks"
Featuring Miley Cyrus
Produced by Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

Is it just me or did it seem like this was Miley's song more than it was Snoop's? This was about 2 minutes too long.
*2 out of 5*


*13. "Boulevard"
Featuring Jahdan Blakkamoore
Produced by Dre Skull, Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

Possibly figuring that "Ashtrays and Heartbreaks" would've been such an anti-climatic closer, this is the first of four "deluxe edition" tracks (and you know how much of a sucker I am for deluxe editions, lol). On this one, Snoop tells a rather easy to follow story about Johnny trying to make out the ghetto, along with a brief closing verse from Jahdan.
*3 out of 5*


*14. "Remedy"
Featuring Busta Rhymes and Chris Brown
Produced by Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

I really like this one right here. Snoop comes with his usual, but man not only does Busta steal the show, but he does so with his own reggae twist and it's pretty good. Tight song, but I'm taking away .5 from the rating because the presence of Chris Brown was not needed here.
*3.5 out of 5*




*15. "La La La"
Produced by Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid

Apparently this was actually his debut as Snoop Lion. If that's the case, he does a decent job and I would recommend this as a starting point.
*3 out of 5*


*16. "Harder Times"
Featuring Jahdan Blakkamoore
Produced by Major Lazer and Dre Skull

We certainly have heard songs like this before (we must persevere even in the midst of hard times), and while Snoop's version doesn't break any new ground, it's message is good.
*3 out of 5*



This was a slight surprise right here, even though I wasn't quite sure what to expect going into this album. I can honestly tell you that not one person I know even bothered to check this out, which is likely due to either not being interested in Snoop with a reggae sound, indifference to him in the latter stages of his career, or both. In my view, this is exceptional and I give mad props to Snoop for stepping outside of his comfort zone and trying/doing something different, and whether we see "Snoop Lion" again is up for debate. Even though he's bringing nothing new to the table in terms of subject matter, the reggae vibe brings a fresh twist to things he has rapped about before. In addition, I feel the key element as to why this worked is the production, handled mostly by Dre Skull, Major Lazer and Ariel Rechtshaid. The beats provide Snoop with a creative environment, whereas if we got the same production found on his previous albums, it clearly wouldn't have had the same effect. Considering the lack of any type of promotion, the album debuted at #16 on the "Billboard 200", with 21,000 units moved in its first week, and a total of 104,000 units moved as of May 2015. If you want to hear Snoop in a different light, I recommend checking this out.



1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Malice n Wonderland" (3.5 stars)
9. "Reincarnated" (3.5 stars)
10. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)
11. "Ego Trippin" (2.5 stars)
12. "Doggumentary" (2 stars)






Release date: May 12, 2015


[Yep, I went ahead and copped a new, physical copy of this one. I remember listening to this via Spotify in '15 and not being too impressed with what I heard, plus I was disappointed with the route Snoop and the Neptunes went considering their previous work together. One year later, will my views remain the same or will they be different? Let's find out!]


All songs produced by Pharrell Williams, with additional production by Chad Hugo


1. "California Roll"
Featuring Stevie Wonder and Pharrell




Exit Snoop Lion and welcome the "return" of Snoop Dogg.


This ode to California, Los Angeles to be exact, was quite the smooth, laid back way to open this album. Quite frankly, I like this one better on second listen. It may come off like it's for the ladies, but I feel the fellas would like this one too.
*4 out of 5*




2. "This City"
Additional Vocals by Charlie Wilson and Kelly Sheehan

This is another "Californicated" song, lol, and it's good, up-tempo with somewhat of a throwback vibe.
*3 out of 5*


3. "R U A Freak"
Additional Vocals by Charlie Wilson and Rhea Dummett

Well, when a certain lady catches the eye of Snoop and her demeanor is quiet/low-key, this is Snoop's way of getting that lady to come up outta her shell and "get with it", lol.
*3 out of 5*


4. "Awake"
Additional Vocals by Charlie Wilson and Pharrell

This one was actually teased quite a bit until it was released. Everything about this song suggests a throwback sound (mainly the 70s) and it works. You can't help but be awake after this one, lol.
*4 out of 5*




5. "So Many Pros"
Additional Vocals by Charlie Wilson, Pharrell, Chad Hugo and Rhea Dummett




I can see why someone would get the (immediate) impression that this is another one for the ladies, but I'll tell you, it's so good that the fellas could enjoy it too, and it wouldn't be out of place at a party. Good stuff.
*4 out of 5*




6. "Peaches N Cream"
Featuring Charlie Wilson, Additional Vocals by Nelly (who received a writing credit), Pharrell and Rhea Dummett




I had to laugh a bit to hear Charlie Wilson say/sing, "damn her ass is go big", lol. In the clip below, Snoop talks about the origins of this song.



It goes without saying that this has no connection to 112's song of the same name, and in fact, I'll prefer this over their original and remix. Again, I like this one and 7 songs in, Snoop sounds so relaxed (and comfortable) over Pharrell's production.
*4 out of 5*




8. "Edibles"
Featuring T.I., Additional Vocals by Charlie Wilson

As genius.com put it, this song "refers to an assortment of foods that are baked infused with weed", lol, truly one the smokers can do their thing too along with some two stepping, lol. Also, I like T.I., but he seemed a bit out of place on this otherwise good song.
*3.5 out of 5*


9. "I Knew That"
Additional Vocals by Charlie Wilson, Pharrell and Rhea Dummett

You mean to tell me Charlie Wilson hasn't worn out his welcome yet, lol. Just kidding, no issues with Mr. Wilson (Snoop likes him a lot obviously). This apply titled song just exemplifies Snoop having fun, nothing more or less.
*3 out of 5*


10. "Run Away"
Featuring Gwen Stefani

Escapism is the theme here, featuring a good guest spot by Gwen Stefani. Running away with the likes of Snoop would probably turn a dreary day into such a dazzling one that your head will probably spin, lol. And in a nice touch, the last minute of the song allows the beat to ride out, instrumental style, and you know I like that, lol.
*3 out of 5*


11. "I'm Ya Dogg"
Featuring Kendrick Lamar and Rick Ross

The album closes on a smooth yet dope note. You would think a song like this would be too smooth for the likes of Kendrick and Ross, but they are not out of place here, and even though I'm not so hard on Ross like I have been in the place, I shook my head at his "now they callin me the truest one to ever do it" line, which is not the case by any stretch of the imagination, but minor grip aside, this was pretty good.
*4 out of 5*






Well, it's clear that I like this one a hell of lot more than I did when it first dropped. I took my time with it and it was quite the smooth, fast paced listening experience, and fast paced is not something you associate a Snoop album with. I understand that Snoop is singing the majority of the time here and Pharrell's production is rather smooth and SO laid back, but what makes this work is that it was something fresh and different, and there's nothing wrong with that when done right. Like I mentioned during the review, Snoop is so relaxed and comfortable over Pharrell's production that it really comes across in the music (I hope they make another album like this together) and none of the songs overstay their welcome. I'll also say that, in a good way, you have to be in a certain mood to listen to this album, and only YOU can determine that, lol.

"Bush" hit #14 on the "Billboard 200" during its first week, moving 32,000 units, also becoming his 6th album to debut at #1 on Billboard's "Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums" chart, going on to sell 250,000 units as of May 2016, which is impressive considering the lack of hype and promotion this album had. 



1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Malice n Wonderland" (3.5 stars)
9. "Bush" (3.5 stars)
10. "Reincarnated" (3.5 stars)
11. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)
12. "Ego Trippin" (2.5 stars)
13. "Doggumentary" (2 stars)






Release dates: July 1, 2016 (digital), July 15, 2016 (physical) 

(And by the time you read this, I will have the physical copy in my collection.)



1. "Legend"
Produced by Bongo

This was quite the apply titled way to start the album. I would make the case of Snoop being a hip hop legend and this song all but makes said case known to all listeners. My only issue with the song was Bongo's production, as I'm simply not a fan of this type of "new wave" of beats (when you hear it you'll know exactly what I'm talking about), and on a sidenote you can probably thank Lex Luger for that. Good song either way though.
*3.5 out of 5*




2. "Ten Toes Down"
Produced by Los

This one (almost) picks up where "Legend" leaves off. In short, Snoop is still the "big dogg boss" some 25 years in the game. That's some serious longevity right there.
*3 out of 5*


3. "Don't Stop"
Featuring Too $hort
Produced by Nottz

"Hall of fame wit this game, legendary to y'all/Another 100 point game, now you can bury the ball" -Snoop


This joint has a 2016 West Coast twist on Afrika Bambaataa & The Soulsonic Force's classic "Planet Rock", which is a nice, throwback touch. And if you think this Too $hort assisted song is all about that usual "pimp shit", that's surprisingly not the case here. Speaking of $hort, you can listen to his voice and tell that he has aged in that regard, but it doesn't disrupt the song.
*4 out of 5*




4. "Super Crip"
Produced by Just Blaze

Man, this joint bangs, seriously. You can take Snoop out the West, but you can't take the West out of Snoop, no doubt. Snoop goes in here, almost a true throwback to the classic Death Row days, circa 92-94, and Just Blaze does a great job creating the audio atmosphere for Snoop (and the way the beat switches is nothing short of ill), one of the best Just Blaze beats I've heard in quite some time. Dope stuff here.
*4 out of 5*




5. "Coolaid Man"
Produced by Cardo, Co-Produced by Cubeatz

Before you may ask, lol, Snoop was not throwing any subliminal shots at Beyonce when he says, "you bitches drinkin lemonade, I'm the coolaid man." This is what Snoop is on at this point, based on "all the flava he's given to the game." ANOTHER dope song right here and it makes it points.
*4 out of 5*




6. "Let Me See Em Up"
Featuring and produced by Swizz Beatz, Co-Produced by Musicman Ty and Avenue Beatz

Thus far, I don't think Snoop has sounded this rowdy (yet still smooth with it) since his tenure at No Limit. I've long said that if Swizz is a guest on a song, he should be confined to hook duties ONLY and that's the case here, plus I believe this marks Snoop's first collaboration with Swizz. Decent.
*3 out of 5*


7. "Point Seen Money Gone"
Featuring Jeremih
Produced by Bongo





A few seconds in and this joint sounds like any other hip hop song on the radio nowadays, with the main/obvious theme being money, something we have all heard before. It's not bad per se, but you're not missing anything.
*2.5 out of 5*


8. "Oh Na Na"
Featuring Wiz Khalifa
Produced by Daz, Co-Produced by Dazmin and Soopafly

Less than creative hook aside, this is another one of those songs that the smokers will like a lot, especially those from the West Coast. I'm not a Wiz Khalifa fan, but his verse surprisingly wasn't that bad, but then again you can expect that when the topic of smoking is front and center.
*3 out of 5*


9. "My Carz"
Produced by J Dilla

Ok, I'm sure if there was a Snoop collaboration with the late J Dilla, we would've heard it about by now, and if this joint was in the vault for years, I'd honestly have a hard time believing it. I'm sure just by looking at the title of the song you already know what it's about. Again, this is nothing we haven't heard before (from Snoop and/or otherwise), plus this beat was a little bit too experimental, for both Snoop and Dilla.
*2 out of 5*


10. "Two Or More"
Produced by Snoop aka Niggarachi

Lol, I wouldn't be surprised to hear that Bootsy Collins' fingerprints were on this in some form, especially when it comes to the hook. Yep, Snoop still loves the ladies, "two or more" of them, lol.
*2.5 out of 5*


11. "Affiliated"
Featuring Trick Trick and NFZ
Produced by Cardo

This appropriately titled song doesn't go hard like you would think and I feel it would've been a much better song had it went in that direction.
*3 out of 5*


12. "Feel About Snoop"
Produced by Rockwilder

I get what this one was going for, but at the same time, it didn't really say too much, if that makes sense. Let's continue on.
*2 out of 5*


13. "Light It Up"
Featuring and produced by Swizz Beatz, Co-Produced by Musicman Ty and Avenue Beatz

This was merely ok, nothing more or less. Most would say having two Swizz produced songs on an album, where he's not producing the majority of it, is a stretch, but let's just say this one holds no candle to "Let Me See Em Up", which isn't saying much.
*2 out of 5*


14. "Side Piece"
Produced by Swizz Beatz

See what I mean about Swizz, smh+lol?? Loyal reader, do you even need to ask what this song is about? You know, Snoop's relationship with his wife is somewhat well documented, so it's beyond me as to why he continues to make songs like this. Nothing more to say about this one.
*1.5 out of 5*


15. "Kush Ups"
Featuring Wiz Khalifa
Produced by KJ Conteh




Another ode to getting high I guess. This one is not better than "Oh Na Na", but again that's not saying too much at all, and did we really need another Wiz Khalifa guest appearance?
*2 out of 5*


16. "Double Tap"
Featuring E-40 and Jazze Pha (producer)

No matter what the intentions were, and I'm sure it's completely obvious, I don't even think the ladies would feel this one all that much. Oh yeah, I don't ever again want to hear Jazze Pha sing much less drop a verse.
*1.5 out of 5*


17. "Got Those"
Produced by Timbaland

Well, we have certainly heard (way) better from both Snoop and Timbaland, so I'll slightly chalk this one up to a missed opportunity, plus some of Snoop's lines in this came off a bit cliched, especially a Jeffersons reference in 2016.
*2.5 out of 5*


18. "Let The Beat Drop (Celebrate)"
Featuring and produced by Swizz Beatz, Co-Produced by Snagz and Musicman Ty

Ok, is it just me or did this pick up where "Light It Up" left off (of all songs to pick)? And we got THREE Swizz appearances (overall) on this album? Wasn't expecting that at all.
*2 out of 5*


19. "What If"
Featuring Suga Free
Produced by Fingazz

I'm a little surprised to see that Suga Free is still active. Now, as a reflective soul myself, I tend to like songs where the theme is "what if", but I'm not sure what to think of this one. I mean the ingredients are there: an S.O.S. Band influence in the production and the aforementioned theme, but it seemingly only exists as a way to get Suga Free on the album.
*2.5 out of 5*


20. "Revolution"
Featuring October London
Produced by Just Blaze

Snoop and Just Blaze are "2 for 2" as this album comes to a close. It's pretty good, but it also comes with quite a few questions. Is this a statement of sorts, in that Snoop is here to stay, continuing his longevity? Is this his unofficial swan song? Am I reading too much into this? I guess the only thing I can say to that is stay tuned.
*4 out of 5*





Man, this album started with a bit of promise, but hot damn does the quality take a SHARP turn after the FIFTH song, and yes you read that right, the FIFTH song. The two Just Blaze produced songs, "Revolution" and "Super Crip", "Coolaid Man", "Don't Stop" and "Legend" saves this album from being up there, or should I say down there with the likes of "Doggumentary", plus the rest of the album can be summed up as being hit and miss. I'm not sure what Snoop was going for here, as the album just seems to have no flow and the absences are truly notable (there's no Neptunes, even Charlie Wilson, more of a presence from Daz, Kurupt, Soopafly, etc). My rating will largely be based on the five songs I mentioned, and I sincerely hope this is not Snoop's last album (and there's nothing on this album to suggest that it is his last).



The FINAL Snoop Dogg rankings and ratings
1. "Doggystyle" (5 stars)
2. "Tha Blue Carpet Treatment" (4.5 stars)
3. "No Limit Top Dogg" (4.5 stars)
4. "Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$" (4.5 stars)
5. "Tha Last Meal" (4 stars)
6. "R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): Da Masterpiece" (3.5 stars)
7. "Da Game Is To Be Sold, Not To Be Told" (3.5 stars)
8. "Malice n Wonderland" (3.5 stars)
9. "Bush" (3.5 stars)
10. "Reincarnated" (3.5 stars)
11. "Tha Doggfather" (3 stars)
12. "Coolaid" (2.5 stars)
13. "Ego Trippin" (2.5 stars)
14. "Doggumentary" (2 stars)




So, the reviews, rankings and ratings of the Snoop Dogg project are in and that brings us to my closing words. At this point, a lot can be said about Snoop, his accomplishments, longevity, success and contributions to hip hop since 1991. He certainly did bring a new style to hip hop (a West Coast style of course), because prior to that you really didn't hear too many artists who were laid back and smooth like Snoop was (and still is). His discography has its highs and lows, but make no mistake about it, he always seem to make a true effort to give us fans what we want, and outside of the "Bush" album, all of his albums exceed 15 songs. As far as I'm concerned, he is a legend and will always be one of the key figures, not just when it comes to West Coast hip hop, but hip hop in general, and I hope he's recognized for that when it's all said and done. Snoop, my hat's off to you. You have done a VERY good job over the years and this (honest) project is my way of saying thank you for all that you have done!!!!!!

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